Liturgy 5-14-2017

This blog is a record of the call to worship, Scripture readings, and prayers from our Sunday liturgies.  If you are interested in writing something for the liturgy, or if you have a concern about any aspect of our liturgy, please email jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Mother's Day Intro

The following is a reading with which we began our liturgy. The majority of this reading is an adaptation of a text written by Amy Young.  You can find her original post here.

As you likely know, today is Mother’s Day.  

We acknowledge Mother’s Day in our liturgy because motherhood is a metaphor that can tell us something about who God is—namely, the One who has birthed us and who comes alongside us as we grow, nurturing us, guiding us toward maturity, and sustaining us along the way.  

It is no secret that Mother’s Day can be a day of complex emotions, both
joyous and sorrowful, and so:

To those who gave birth this year to your first child—we celebrate withyou.

To those who lost a child this year – we mourn with you.

To those who are in the trenches with little ones every day and wear the
badge of food stains – we appreciate you.

To those who step-parent - we walk with you on these complex paths

To those who are single mothers -- we have deep respect and
admiration for you.

To those who lived through driving tests, medical tests, and the overall
testing of motherhood – we are better for having you in our midst.

To those who experienced loss through miscarriage, failed adoptions,
running away, or any other circumstance—we mourn with you.

To those who walk the hard path of infertility, fraught with pokes, prods,
tears, and disappointment – we walk with you. Forgive us when we say foolish things. We don’t mean to make this harder than it is.

To those who are mentor moms, and spiritual moms – we need you.

To those who are foster moms -- we appreciate you, and we thank you.

To those who will have emptier nests in the upcoming year – we grieve
and rejoice with you

To those who have warm and close relationships with your children – we
celebrate with you.

To those who have disappointment, heart ache, and distance with your
children – we sit with you.

To those who lost their mothers this year – we grieve with you.

To those who experienced abuse at the hands of your own mother – we
acknowledge you and will walk with you.

To those who are single and long to be married and mothering your own
children - we mourn that life has not turned out the way you longed for it to be.

To those who placed children up for adoption – we commend you for
your selflessness and remember how you hold that child in your heart.

And to those who are pregnant with new life, both expected and
surprising – we anticipate with you.

This Mother’s Day, we walk with you. Mothering is not for the faint of heart and we have real warriors in our midst. We remember you.

 Call to Worship

We have gathered to worship the Creator

The One Who gave birth
to all of creation

 And to be formed by the Wisdom of God,

The One Who gathers the vulnerable
like a hen gathers her children

under her wings

Through the power of the Spirit,

The One Who greets
every newborn creature
with the kiss of life
and is raising the world
from death to glory

 Amen.

Scripture

Psalm 31:1-5, 15-16

In you, O Lord, have I taken refuge;
let me never be put to shame;
deliver me in your righteousness.
Incline your ear to me;
make haste to deliver me.
 
Be my strong rock, a castle to keep me safe,
for you are my crag and my stronghold;
for the sake of your Name, lead me and guide me.
 
Take me out of the net that they
have secretly set for me,
for you are my tower of strength.
Into your hands I commend my spirit,
for you have redeemed me,
O Lord, O God of truth.
 
My times are in your hand;
rescue me from the hand of my enemies,
and from those who persecute me.
Make your face to shine upon your servant,
and in your loving-kindness save me."

John 14:1-14

Jesus said, “Do not let your hearts be troubled. Believe in God, believe also in me. In my Father’s house there are many dwelling places. If it were not so, would I have told you that I go to prepare a place for you? And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and will take you to myself, so that where I am, there you may be also. And you know the way to the place where I am going.”
 
Thomas said to him, “Lord, we do not know where you are going. How can we know the way?” Jesus said to him, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me. If you know me, you will know my Father also. From now on you do know him and have seen him.” 
 
Philip said to him, “Lord, show us the Father, and we will be satisfied.” Jesus said to him, “Have I been with you all this time, Philip, and you still do not know me? Whoever has seen me has seen the Father. How can you say, ‘Show us the Father’?
 
Do you not believe that I am in the Father and the Father is in me? The words that I say to you I do not speak on my own; but the Father who dwells in me does his works. Believe me that I am in the Father and the Father is in me; but if you do not, then believe me because of the works themselves.
 
Very truly, I tell you, the one who believes in me will also do the works that I do and, in fact, will do greater works than these, because I am going to the Father. I will do whatever you ask in my name, so that the Father may be glorified in the Son. If in my name you ask me for anything, I will do it.

 

Setlist 5-14-2017

This week was the fourth Sunday of Easter, and our songs were gathered around the theme of....Easter.  Below, you’ll find the list of the songs and artists. Clicking the song titles will take you to the lyrics. Below the songs, you can find recordings from Sunday morning of a few of them, and below the recordings, there is an example of one way you might think of these songs in light of this week's theme. If you want to talk about any of these, feel free to comment at the bottom of this page or email me at jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Songs:

Come Thou Fount

Fall Afresh by Jeremy Riddle

There by Jameson McGregor

Heart With No Companion by Leonard Cohen

Pulse by Jameson McGregor

Doxology

How They Fit In:

There are many ways to think about the significance of songs and the way they fit together–-this is simply one way you can look at these songs in light of this week’s theme. 

Come Thou Fount: We sang this song to give voice to our gratitude for God's activity in our lives thus far, and to graft the Resurrection into that list of wonders.  It is an exercise in looking back to inform our looking forward--to examine who God has been to inform our expectations of who God will be.

Fall Afresh: This song is a petition for the Spirit that brought Jesus through death into Life to dwell among us and renew the whole of ourselves.

There: This song gives voice to God's transcendence over/above any anxieties we face in life. We sang it to enhance the idea that we have been carrying about God's immanence in the midst of our pain in the suffering of Jesus.  The Resurrection is a marriage of the immanence of Jesus and the transcendence of God, a Yes that crashes through the No of pain and death.

Heart With No Companion: This song imagines the implications of the vast and shattered love of God.  It is both wide reaching, and acquainted with pain, and thus is able to find us in the midst of our own pain.  The chorus focuses on an oft-overlooked kind of pain that arises out of unmet expectations or a disconnect between passion and circumstance.

Pulse: We sang this song to look over our shoulder at last week's songs.  This is what we said about Pulse then: This song speaks to the effect of the Resurrection on life in the world.  The Resurrection is driven by the transformative power that spreads through the entire cosmos, the Spirit of God.  And this same transformative power is working to raise what is dead in us.  

Doxology: We close our time together each week with this proclamation that God is worthy of praise from every inch of the cosmos.

-JM

ITLOTC 5-12-17

ITLOTC

(In The Life Of The Church) 

Easter

Writing the Newsletter

I started the newsletter in November of 2013.  I did it because the staff kept getting feedback that communication was poor.  It seemed liked a natural next step, especially in the world of digital communication.  It's a pretty routine process ... I get info from staff.  I copy the template from the week before.  I update the announcements and work is worship section.  BUT there is alway the article.  Like most things that demand creativity, it comes in waves.  Sometimes writing is seamless.  Sometimes it's like pulling teeth.  I recently begun outsourcing some of the writing, mostly to Jamie, more recently to Taylor and soon you will find a pretty steady rotation in the newsletter.  

That being said, I'm not feeling it this week and Toph told me that the article isn't why people read the newsletter anyway.  So instead I'm going to post four thing here that I really like or that I think are engaging or thought provoking. 

1. The Heineken Beer commercial.  You may have seen this pop up on social media.  Something like: "What Pepsi got wrong Heineken got right."  I count almost every thing on the internet click bait, but Toph specifically emailed the rest of the staff this vide and said watch it.  So i did.  In short, it's about having hard conversations in a world that no longer wants to do that.  

2. Rain, rain and more rain.  I'm really sensitive to noise.  It's not that I can't handle loud things, but if my ears find a noise unpleasant, it really grits me.  Kind of like chewing on tin foil.  So i have a routine now.  In the evenings after my kids are in bed, Lindsay and I head to the screen porch with our books and i turn on my ten hour rain soundtrack.  It's like living in Seattle without all the mud.  

3. This piece on being pro-life and health care.  I'm politically moderate.  I don't say that to appease largest number of people or because I don't have conviction (though those things can both be true of me).  I mean that i've voted for presidents of both major parties multiple times.  My ballots are usually split.  I find bi-partison efforts admirable.  I like that our government has checks and balances.  I also like when my suppositions are challenged.  I've preached before on the role of the church in social justice issues.  My perspective was challenged, sharpened if you will, by this article from a Wacoan published in the Washington Post. 

4. Oil and Honey.  I just finished this book by activist-professor Bill McKibben.  In full disclosure it is decidedly leftist in it's environmental politics.  But the book is also about Bill's two lives. The one as an environmental activist and leader of 350.org and the other as interested and aspiring apiarist.  His journey is that of a concerned citizen and it reads like a memior.  I loved it. 

Satan Slayed

It has turned out to be a bad semester for a our regular sports writer Flip Majkowski to take a sabbatical.  But let's be honest.  After the deacon board made a unanimous decision to fire Slayer softball coach Byron Roldan after the '15 softball season, we thought there was little hope for the athletic department at UBC.  So you can imagine our astonishment when, after quietly finishing off a regular spring basketball season and earning a four seed in the tourney, the mens basketball squad told a 30 for 30 type of Cinderella story.  

With just 8 kids, barely enough behinds to the keep the bench room temperature much less warm, a shorthanded Slayer squad played valiant basketball.   At midpoint this season, after a embarrassing loss to The Antioch Magi, Coach Whisnant decided what his team needed to do was run.  Run they did.  Wind sprint after wind sprint after wind sprint.  Eventually, Slayers formed themselves into a pack of gazelles.  They would not lose another game because of conditioning.  

In the first game of the tournament, the Slayers handled the #5 seeded Episcopalian Liturgists, outscoring 18-4 in the fourth quarter.  Shooting guard Shane Ward heated up and the rest of the team never cooled down.  But what really alerted the ecclesiological sports world that a Goliath had awakened, was that the Slayers trounced the #1 seeded Pentecostal Pneumas.  It was a game of strategy.  Coach Whisnant identified that they needed to shut down all diocese first team point guard Joel Montanus and Pneumas offense would fall apart.  What the Slayers lack in youth, they make up in wisdom.  Montanus shot just 3-15 beyond the arc and the pentecostals were out hustled by the spirit of Mike Studer and Chad May.  

So to the championship game the Slayers went taking on another local baptist giant.  #3 seeded Columbus Ave. If you know your Baptist politics, you know what this game meant to the world around it.  

The championship had pace.  It had drama.  It had the all diocese first team play of power forward Jason Phillips, but in the end it was Slayer small forward Jonathon White who couldn't be matched.  White a Sr. transfer from China Spring, TX put on a clinic, shooting 59% from the field and finishing with one of the seasons few triple/doubles.  What White didn't do on defense was made up for by the athleticism of Justin Begnoche.  This game even reminded fans that geriatric medicine can work wonders, as veterans Doctor D. Wilhite and Trevor Carlson made significant contributions.  

In the end it was a Slayer victory.  Not just for a team of 8 ragtag kids from around the greater metropolitan Waco area, but an entire community that refused to give up hope.  UBC is now a better place.  UBC's had it's victories in the past.  Crowder gave us a Dove award for the Light Bright video.  In '15 we won WISD partner of the year.  We've snagged a few golden apples along the way.  But the pride the community wears with this victory is different.  It's transcendent.  It's a church basketball league trophy and likely approval from God that He loves our theology, because as the great theologians of the church have always maintained, those things always go hand in hand.  

The Spring '17 Slayer basketball squad.  Not pictured, Chad May who, on the way to the championship game, spotted a kitten stuck in the tree and decided to save it.  Thanks Chad for doing the right thing.  

The Spring '17 Slayer basketball squad.  Not pictured, Chad May who, on the way to the championship game, spotted a kitten stuck in the tree and decided to save it.  Thanks Chad for doing the right thing.  

 

Sunday School

Sunday School has officially come to an end.  Thank you to all of our leaders who faithfully gave of their time.  We will resume with Summer Sunday School or triple S as I like to call it, in June.  Stay tuned for riveting information.  

Office Manger Search

UBC is looking for a new office manager.  Our friend and collogue Amy Smith Carman is moving on to do Ph.D. work at TCU.  Congratulations Amy!  We are proud of you and grateful for your contributions to the UBC staff and the larger church. Amy is the second office manager who is leaving us to go do a PhD, so we feel like this position really opens doors for people.    Person's interested in applying can find a job description and application here

Pastoral Associates

UBC is now accepting applications for the pastoral associate program.  You can read more about the program and find the information needed to apply by clicking  here

Work is Worship

Greeters: Ricky & Juliet 

Coffee Makers: 

Mug Cleaners: Zunigas 

Money Counter: Hannah K. 

Announcements

  • Sunday Sermon: Please be in prayer for our friend and pastoral associate Marshall Cook who will be preaching this Sunday.  
  • Our Thailand teams leaves this Sunday, 5-14-17.  Please be in prayer for them as they travel and that God would do meaningful things with our presence there. 

Do you have an emergency and need to talk to a pastor? 

254 413 2611

Leadership Team

If you have a concern or an idea for UBC that you’d like to share with someone that is not on staff, feel free to contact one of our leadership team members. 

Chair- Jon Davis: jdavis83@gmail.com

Byron Griffin: byrontgriffin@gmail.com

Stan Denman: Stan_Denman@baylor.edu

Adam Winn:  adamwinn68@yahoo.com

Bridget Heins: bheins@hot.rr.com

Sharyl Loeung: sharylwl@gmail.com

Emma Wood: emmaj.wood@yahoo.com

Student Position: Samuel Moore: samuel_moore2@baylor.edu

Student Position: Leah Reed: Leah_Reed@baylor.edu

UBC Finance Team

Do you have a question about UBC’s financial affairs? Please feel free to contact any of your finance team members.

Josh McCormick: Josh.McCormick@dwyergroup.com

Hannah Kuhl: HannahKuhl@hotmail.com  

Justin Pond: pondjw@gmail.com

Anna Tilson: Anna_Tilson@jrbt.com

Doug McNamee: douglas_mcnamee@baylor.edu

UBC HR Team

If you have concerns about staff and would like contact our human resources team, please feel free to email any of the following members.

Maxcey Blaylock: maxceykite@gmail.com

Mathew Crawford: mathewcrawford@yahoo.com

Rob Engblom: Rob_Engblom@baylor.edu

Ross Van Dyke: Ross_Vandyke@baylor.edu

Jared Gould: jared.gould1@gmail.com

Liturgy 5-7-2017

This blog is a record of the call to worship, Scripture readings, and prayers from our Sunday liturgies.  If you are interested in writing something for the liturgy, or if you have a concern about any aspect of our liturgy, please email jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Call to Worship

we have gathered to worship the Risen Lord

the One who came
that we might have life 

seeking to be formed into resurrection people

those who know that life
is most definitely a gift 

and who look to the Spirit
to shape us into better stewards of this gift

as a living thanks to the Giver.

amen

Scripture

Psalm 23

The Eternal is my shepherd, cares for me always.
The Eternal provides me rest in rich, green fields
   beside streams of refreshing water.

The Eternal soothes my fears;
The Eternal makes me whole again,
   steering me off worn, hard paths
   to roads where truth and righteousness echo the Name.

Even in the unending shadows of death’s darkness,
   I am not overcome by fear.
Because You are with me in those dark moments,
   near with Your protection and guidance,
   I am comforted.

You spread out a table before me,
   provisions in the midst of attack from my enemies;
You care for all my needs, anointing my head with soothing, fragrant oil,
   filling my cup again and again with Your grace.

Certainly Your faithful protection and loving provision will pursue me
   where I go, always, everywhere.
I will always be with the Eternal,
   in Your house forever.

John 10:1-10

 “Very truly, I tell you, anyone who does not enter the sheepfold by the gate but climbs in by another way is a thief and a bandit. The one who enters by the gate is the shepherd of the sheep. The gatekeeper opens the gate for him, and the sheep hear his voice. He calls his own sheep by name and leads them out.

When he has brought out all his own, he goes ahead of them, and the sheep follow him because they know his voice. They will not follow a stranger, but they will run from him because they do not know the voice of strangers.” Jesus used this figure of speech with them, but they did not understand what he was saying to them.

So again Jesus said to them, “Very truly, I tell you, I am the gate for the sheep.  All who came before me are thieves and bandits; but the sheep did not listen to them.  I am the gate.

Whoever enters by me will be saved, and will come in and go out and find pasture. The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy. I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly.

Prayer

This week's prayer was from An Iona Prayer Book (p.98):

Lord of Life
we celebrate your countless gifts
in days and nights,
in rainbows and rain,
in touch, dream, and smile,
in partners who love,
in kids who cuddle,
in grannies who listen,
in friends who care,
in dogs that lick,
in hands that sew,
in food on the table;
yet above all,
in your coming among us,
walking our roads,
calling our names,
enfolding our lives,
inviting us home.

Amen.

Setlist 5-7-2017

This week was the fourth Sunday of Easter, and our songs were gathered around the theme of....Easter.  Below, you’ll find the list of the songs and artists. Clicking the song titles will take you to the lyrics. Below the songs, you can find recordings from Sunday morning of a few of them, and below the recordings, there is an example of one way you might think of these songs in light of this week's theme. If you want to talk about any of these, feel free to comment at the bottom of this page or email me at jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Songs:

Chariot by Page France

Pulse by Jameson McGregor

How Great Thou Art

Pain by Jameson McGregor

Wayward Ones by The Gladsome Light

Doxology

How They Fit In:

There are many ways to think about the significance of songs and the way they fit together–-this is simply one way you can look at these songs in light of this week’s theme. 

Chariot: The chorus of this song captures a central theme of the Easter season: we will become a happy ending.  In this simple phrase, we find the core implication of the Resurrection.  The Love of God is unhindered on a fundamental level, even by death.  God's Yes overwhelms any No that might come before it.  

Pulse: This song speaks to the effect of the Resurrection on life in the world.  The Resurrection is driven by the transformative power that spreads through the entire cosmos, the Spirit of God.  And this same transformative power is working to raise what is dead in us.  

How Great Thou Art: We sang this song to look over our shoulder at last week's songs.  This is what we said about How Great Thou Art then: This song gives us language to situate the death and resurrection of Jesus within a broader observation of God's grandeur.  The song begins with an observation of the wonders God has made throughout the cosmos, and goes on to observe the trajectory of God's making all things new.  In the chorus, it offers us a chance to practice channeling this wonder into praise of God.

Pain: In the death and Resurrection of Jesus, we find that God is able to bear the weight of our suffering and somehow paint life on the other side. This Event offers us a picture of what God can make of our own pain, and it stands as an image of Hope.  The chorus of this song,

but the God of the Lighter Load
can take the weight of the pain we hold
until the sting becomes about much more than the pain
it's the place
that we dwell in a  Living Hope
the architecture of the ones who know
that, in the end, healing comes like the day:
from the night

is not suggesting that God takes our pain away, but instead enters into our pain and is carrying out the work of transformational healing.  This Hope hinges on the image of the Resurrection, on the fact that Jesus's suffering was not miraculously alleviated or cut short, but rather was the first part of a broader story that transcended the suffering itself.  

Wayward Ones: We sing this song every time we take communion to remind ourselves of a couple of things.  First, we are a broken people--though we are seeking to become more like Jesus, we often fail at this.  Second, Christ has given Himself for us despite our brokenness.  We take communion to remember the sacrifice of Jesus on our behalf, even though we did not, and do not, deserve it.

Doxology: We close our time together each week with this proclamation that God is worthy of praise from every inch of the cosmos.

-JM

ITLOTC 5-5-17

ITLOTC

(In The Life Of The Church) 

Easter

Leadership Team Meeting Report

Friends,

The Leadership Team meeting met this past Sunday night and at that meeting a few things were done. 

HR

A report on annual reviews of staff was given by HR team rep. Mathew Crawford.  No one is being fired or put on probation.  All in all we have a good squad. 

  • Amy is stepping down as our office manager on May 19th.  
  • Emmy Edwards was approved as our interim office manager.  
  • We hope to have a new person hired by June 1st.  
  • The search committee is made up of 5 people.  A staff rep., HR rep., lead team rep., and to lay members selected by the lead team.  That committee is Taylor Post, Rob Engblom, Adam Winn, Taylor Torregrossa, and Jeff Walter.  

Finance

The annual budget was approved as proposed by finance team.  That budget can be viewed on request.  Please email josh@ubcwaco.org for a copy of the budget.   Any questions about financial concerns at UBC can be directed at any finance team member or leadership team member listed at the bottom of the newsletter. 

Scholarship Recipients

In compliance with the BGCT the leadership team approved all ministry scholarship applicants. 

OAR

As many of you know, Toph has been leading a committee to investigate Ownership and Accountability.  This committee was originally formed in response the larger question: what does it mean to belong to/be a member of UBC?  That team has compiled a document that maps out three levels of involvement.  Leadership team worked through this document and Toph and his team are taking it to the next phase which will address implementation strategies.  

Town Hall Debrief

Our April town hall addressed the issue of space and the future use of space at UBC.  The leadership team talked about what was discussed and heard at that meeting.  These are the three actionable steps that were decided on by leadership team. 

  1.  we will bring in a architect/designer to help us assess our current space. 
  2.  we will contact the city and investigate the cost and possibility of shutting down Flint St. between 17th and 18th st. 
  3.  the leadership team is going to meet with full time staff this Sunday, 5-7-17, after church to further discuss space, aesthetic and ethos concerns.  

If you have any further questions or concerns about what was discussed at leadership team, please feel free to contact myself josh@ubcwaco.org or any of the leadership team members. 

Thailand Partnership Help

Our team is heading out on Sunday, May 14th, and one of our partners asked that we would bring American Board games.  If you would like to help out, bring a new or used board game to church on Sunday.  We are looking for games like Monopoly, Life, CandyLand, etc….  No card games, simply board games.  If you have any questions, please email

Office Manger Search

UBC is looking for a new office manager.  Our friend and collogue Amy Smith Carman is moving on to do Ph.D. work at TCU.  Congratulations Amy!  We are proud of you and grateful for your contributions to the UBC staff and the larger church.  Person's interested in applying can find a job description and application here

Pastoral Associates

UBC is now accepting applications for the pastoral associate program.  You can read more about the program and find the information needed to apply by clicking  here

Work is Worship

Greeters: Walters

Coffee Makers: Emmy/Stephen 

Mug Cleaners: Dilan B. 

Money Counter: Anna Tilson

Announcements

Do you have an emergency and need to talk to a pastor? 

254 413 2611

Leadership Team

If you have a concern or an idea for UBC that you’d like to share with someone that is not on staff, feel free to contact one of our leadership team members. 

Chair- Jon Davis: jdavis83@gmail.com

Byron Griffin: byrontgriffin@gmail.com

Stan Denman: Stan_Denman@baylor.edu

Adam Winn:  adamwinn68@yahoo.com

Bridget Heins: bheins@hot.rr.com

Sharyl Loeung: sharylwl@gmail.com

Emma Wood: emmaj.wood@yahoo.com

Student Position: Samuel Moore: samuel_moore2@baylor.edu

Student Position: Leah Reed: Leah_Reed@baylor.edu

UBC Finance Team

Do you have a question about UBC’s financial affairs? Please feel free to contact any of your finance team members.

Josh McCormick: Josh.McCormick@dwyergroup.com

Hannah Kuhl: HannahKuhl@hotmail.com  

Justin Pond: pondjw@gmail.com

Anna Tilson: Anna_Tilson@jrbt.com

Doug McNamee: douglas_mcnamee@baylor.edu

UBC HR Team

If you have concerns about staff and would like contact our human resources team, please feel free to email any of the following members.

Maxcey Blaylock: maxceykite@gmail.com

Mathew Crawford: mathewcrawford@yahoo.com

Rob Engblom: Rob_Engblom@baylor.edu

Ross Van Dyke: Ross_Vandyke@baylor.edu

Jared Gould: jared.gould1@gmail.com

 

Liturgy 4-30-2017

This blog is a record of the call to worship, Scripture readings, and prayers from our Sunday liturgies.  If you are interested in writing something for the liturgy, or if you have a concern about any aspect of our liturgy, please email jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Call to Worship

As we draw near to a season
that means change for many of our lives

we have gathered to worship
the One who makes all things new

as chapters close
as rhythms begin to change
as summer approaches

we seek all the same to be
more fully formed in the way of Christ

Spirit of Life, who raised
Jesus from the grave 

raise us also
and train our eyes
to find Your beauty

all around us

Amen.

Scripture

Psalm 116:1-3, 10-17

I love the Lord, because he has heard the voice of my supplication,
because he has inclined his ear to me whenever I called upon him.

The cords of death entangled me;
the grip of the grave took hold of me;
I came to grief and sorrow.
Then I called upon the Name of the Lord:
"O Lord, I pray you, save my life."

How shall I repay the Lord
for all the good things he has done for me?
I will lift up the cup of salvation
and call upon the Name of the Lord.

I will fulfill my vows to the Lord
in the presence of all his people.
Precious in the sight of the Lord
is the death of his servants.

O Lord, I am your servant;
I am your servant and the child of your handmaid;
you have freed me from my bonds.
I will offer you the sacrifice of thanksgiving
and call upon the Name of the Lord.

I will fulfill my vows to the Lord
in the presence of all his people,
In the courts of the Lord's house,
in the midst of you, O Jerusalem.
Hallelujah!

Matthew 13:1-9, 31-32, 44-46

That same day Jesus went out of the house and sat beside the sea.  Such great crowds gathered around him that he got into a boat and sat there, while the whole crowd stood on the beach.  And he told them many things in parables, saying: “Listen! A sower went out to sow.  And as he sowed, some seeds fell on the path, and the birds came and ate them up.  Other seeds fell on rocky ground, where they did not have much soil, and they sprang up quickly, since they had no depth of soil.  

 But when the sun rose, they were scorched; and since they had no root, they withered away. Other seeds fell among thorns, and the thorns grew up and choked them. Other seeds fell on good soil and brought forth grain, some a hundredfold, some sixty, some thirty. Let anyone with ears listen!”

He put before them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven is like a mustard seed that someone took and sowed in his field; it is the smallest of all the seeds, but when it has grown it is the greatest of shrubs and becomes a tree, so that the birds of the air come and make nests in its branches.”

“The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field, which someone found and hid; then in his joy he goes and sells all that he has and buys that field.

“Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a merchant in search of fine pearls; on finding one pearl of great value, he went and sold all that he had and bought it.

Graduate Litany

Graduates, as you continue
your journeys beyond this season
remember the vision God has for You

to do justice
to love mercy
and to walk humbly
with our God

as you enter into offices, labs, hospitals,
job sites, schools, and wherever
else you find yourselves,
remember the vocation that permeates all others

to be more fully formed
in the way of Christ

and as you leave this community called ubc,
know that you carry us with you,
and remember the challenge we have carried together

to love God
embrace beauty
and live life to the fullest

Amen.

 

Setlist 4-30-2017

This week was the third Sunday of Easter, and our songs were gathered around the theme of....Easter.  Below, you’ll find the list of the songs and artists. Clicking the song titles will take you to the lyrics. Below the songs, you can find recordings from Sunday morning of a few of them, and below the recordings, there is an example of one way you might think of these songs in light of this week's theme. If you want to talk about any of these, feel free to comment at the bottom of this page or email me at jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Songs:

Death In His Grave by John Mark McMillan

How Great Thou Art

Because He Lives by Bill and Gloria Gaither

Inbreaking by Jameson McGregor

Amazing Grace by Citizens & Saints

Doxology

How They Fit In:

There are many ways to think about the significance of songs and the way they fit together–-this is simply one way you can look at these songs in light of this week’s theme. 

Death In His Grave: We sang this song to narrate again the defeat of death that we observe in this season.  

How Great Thou Art: This song gives us language to situate the death and resurrection of Jesus within a broader observation of God's grandeur.  The song begins with an observation of the wonders God has made throughout the cosmos, and goes on to observe the trajectory of God's making all things new.  In the chorus, it offers us a chance to practice channeling this wonder into praise of God.

Because He Lives:  This song takes a few swings at articulating the ways in which the Resurrection shapes the way we engage life now--particularly life's uncertain elements.  It offers us the chance to pull the thread between Jesus' breaking through one of the more absolute elements of finite existence (death), and any anxieties we might have about life.  Put differently, the Event of the resurrection calls into question what we think we know about how the world works, and gives us reason to hold the stubborn hope that God is actively working to redeem every broken part of creation.  This connection is easy to pay lip service to, but really living as though it were true is a life project. 

Inbreaking: I've been working on this song for a couple of months.  For the first few weeks, I had a handful of lines, but had no idea what they meant.  As I kept working at it, I started to see Easter themes emerging.  Taken all together, this is a song about the Risen Lord raising us also, both as individuals and as the Body of Christ.  It's not squarely focused on the events of Easter, but it is intimately concerned with the role that Eastertide plays in the life of the Church year.

Amazing Grace: We sang this song to look over our shoulder at last week's songs.  This is what we said about Amazing Grace then: The Resurrection is a transformative act of grace that has implications for the whole of creation.  It is a Yes to life and the created world. This song talks about the implications of the Resurrection for our lives, and we sang it to rehearse speaking the truth about God's ongoing redemption project in our midst.

Doxology: We close our time together each week with this proclamation that God is worthy of praise from every inch of the cosmos.

-JM

ITLOTC 4-28-17

ITLOTC

(In The Life Of The Church) 

Easter

Eastertide//Resurrection

The Story we live in year after year entered its fourth chapter recently.  To recap the Story thus far, we began by waiting in the darkness of Advent, looking around to see how very badly the world needs a Light.  That Light entered the darkness on Christmas, and shone throughout the season of Epiphany, where we spent time learning again what God would have us know about who God is and who we are in the Person of Jesus.  Then we entered the wilderness of Lent, following Jesus in asking the question of who we are and what we are for, or taken differently: what does it mean to live life to the fullest?  And with the death and Resurrection of Jesus, we have now entered the season of Easter/Resurrection.  

In the events of Good Friday, Holy Saturday, and Easter Sunday, we are offered a challenge to the way we engage life at a fundamental level.  I can think of at least three ways in which this is the case.  

First, we find that, as Karl Barth says, “the goal of human life is not death, but resurrection.”  Jesus’ Resurrection impacts the expectations we hold of the finality of death.  But the context of Jesus’ Resurrection—coming on the other side of a death carried out by the political power of the Roman Empire at the urging of powerful religious leaders—also changes something about what we expect of life.  It’s the audacity to hope that, for all the ways in which the world confirms our deepest fears, things don’t necessarily work the way we might expect.  Having seen victory rise out of absolute defeat, we are left with a hope that is equally skilled at not staying dead.  This ultimately chips away at the role of fear in our lives. 

Second, it offers us a transformed way to look at the natural ebb and flow of life.  There are myriad deaths we experience.  Chapters of life come to a close.  Relationships fall apart.  Jobs are lost.  Faith paradigms shift.  Our personal interests move on.  Put simply: things change.  And when things change, blatantly tragically so or not, we are faced with coming to terms with this change.  This coming to terms is a kind of grief. On Good Friday and Holy Saturday, we practice meaningful grief along with the disciples.  We do this from a vantage point in time where we know what Event is coming on Sunday, but we do it nonetheless because we know that the grief matters.  It allows us to honor what was lost, fueled by an understanding of the goodness of the life that preceded the death. But just as there are deaths that we experience time and again in life, we also find that new chapters begin, relationships rekindle, we take up new hobbies, etc.  Life continues.  Resurrection greets us.  In Easter, we find a challenge posed to us regarding how we will rejoice at the new possibilities we find on the other side of death.  A challenge to ride the fear and uncertainty of the empty tomb into the joy and wonder of encountering the Risen Lord on the road.  

Third, it changes the way we experience the world.  In the Resurrection, we find an emphatic Yes to life and creation. We find a vision of the other side of pain and rejection—an image of redemption painted in flesh and blood.  And this image reaffirms what the biblical narrative has been getting at the whole time: God’s response to the brokenness of the world is not to do away with the world, but to make it new.  The Resurrection event is one of beauty out of brokenness.  It changes the way we see the world by reassuring us that all is not lost, and by training us to seek out and embrace the beauty that we encounter in life as though it spoke something more true about the way things really are than any of the more bleak messengers we might encounter.

So, those are three ways you can think about the challenge posed by Easter as we make our way through this season.  But I hope that, beyond these things, you spend time asking what else this season of Resurrection might be teaching you this year.

If you have any questions or want to discuss any of this further, feel free to email jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Office Manger Search

UBC is looking for a new office manager.  Our friend and collogue Amy Smith Carman is moving on to do Ph.D. work at TCU.  Congratulations Amy!  We are proud of you and grateful for your contributions to the UBC staff and the larger church.  Person's interested in applying can find a job description and application here

Study Hall

It is the most wonderful time of year again, Study Hall at UBC.  The building will be open from 10am-midnight for you to study.  We will have all the coffee, refreshments, and snacks you can want.  And yes, we will have the best pancakes in the state of TX at 10pm, so don’t miss out.  The average student who studies at UBC for their finals make an A 97.4%, and those don’t get caught daydreaming about what a great time it was.  See you on Tuesday.  

Rend Collective

One week from today (May 5), ubc is hosting a Rend Collective concert at 7pm.  If you'd like to purchase tickets, you can do so here.

Pastoral Associates

UBC is now accepting applications for the pastoral associate program.  You can read more about the program and find the information needed to apply by clicking  here

Work is Worship

Greeters: Will Dewitt

Coffee Makers: Kareem 

Mug Cleaners: Kaylin

Money Counter: Josh M. 

Announcements

  • Sunday Sermon: Mr. Roger's Sunday. 
  • This Sunday night will be our April Leadership Team meeting. Please be in prayer as this group navigates decisions for the future.  

Do you have an emergency and need to talk to a pastor? 

254 413 2611

Leadership Team

If you have a concern or an idea for UBC that you’d like to share with someone that is not on staff, feel free to contact one of our leadership team members. 

Chair- Jon Davis: jdavis83@gmail.com

Byron Griffin: byrontgriffin@gmail.com

Stan Denman: Stan_Denman@baylor.edu

Adam Winn:  adamwinn68@yahoo.com

Bridget Heins: bheins@hot.rr.com

Sharyl Loeung: sharylwl@gmail.com

Emma Wood: emmaj.wood@yahoo.com

Student Position: Samuel Moore: samuel_moore2@baylor.edu

Student Position: Leah Reed: Leah_Reed@baylor.edu

UBC Finance Team

Do you have a question about UBC’s financial affairs? Please feel free to contact any of your finance team members.

Josh McCormick: Josh.McCormick@dwyergroup.com

Hannah Kuhl: HannahKuhl@hotmail.com  

Justin Pond: pondjw@gmail.com

Anna Tilson: Anna_Tilson@jrbt.com

Doug McNamee: douglas_mcnamee@baylor.edu

UBC HR Team

If you have concerns about staff and would like contact our human resources team, please feel free to email any of the following members.

Maxcey Blaylock: maxceykite@gmail.com

Mathew Crawford: mathewcrawford@yahoo.com

Rob Engblom: Rob_Engblom@baylor.edu

Ross Van Dyke: Ross_Vandyke@baylor.edu

Jared Gould: jared.gould1@gmail.com

Liturgy 4-23-2017

This blog is a record of the call to worship, Scripture readings, and prayers from our Sunday liturgies.  If you are interested in writing something for the liturgy, or if you have a concern about any aspect of our liturgy, please email jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Call to Worship

we have gathered together to worship the Risen One

filled with faith, doubt, joy, and wonder

like Thomas, we reach for a certainty beyond rumors,
our hands reach for wounds they cannot find

but instead we find
our own wounds graced with hope,

our eyes adjusting to the Light

Spirit of Life, as You raised Christ from death

Raise us also
And draw us in

to your work of redemption

Amen.

Scripture

Psalm 16

Protect me, O God, for I take refuge in you;
I have said to the Lord, "You are my Lord,
my good above all other."
All my delight is upon the godly that are in the land,
upon those who are noble among the people.

But those who run after other gods
shall have their troubles multiplied.
Their libations of blood I will not offer,
nor take the names of their gods upon my lips.

O Lord, you are my portion and my cup;
it is you who uphold my lot.
My boundaries enclose a pleasant land;
indeed, I have a goodly heritage.
I will bless the Lord who gives me counsel;
my heart teaches me, night after night.

I have set the Lord always before me;
because he is at my right hand I shall not fall.
My heart, therefore, is glad, and my spirit rejoices;
my body also shall rest in hope.

For you will not abandon me to the grave,
nor let your holy one see the Pit.
You will show me the path of life;
in your presence there is fullness of joy,
and in your right hand are pleasures for evermore.

John 20:19-31

When it was evening on that day, the first day of the week, and the doors of the house where the disciples had met were locked for fear of the Jews, Jesus came and stood among them and said, "Peace be with you." After he said this, he showed them his hands and his side. Then the disciples rejoiced when they saw the Lord.

Jesus said to them again, "Peace be with you. As the Father has sent me, so I send you." When he had said this, he breathed on them and said to them, "Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven them; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained."

But Thomas (who was called the Twin), one of the twelve, was not with them when Jesus came. So the other disciples told him, "We have seen the Lord." But he said to them, "Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side, I will not believe."

A week later his disciples were again in the house, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were shut, Jesus came and stood among them and said, "Peace be with you."

Then he said to Thomas, "Put your finger here and see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it in my side. Do not doubt but believe." Thomas answered him, "My Lord and my God!" Jesus said to him, "Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe."

Now Jesus did many other signs in the presence of his disciples, which are not written in this book. But these are written so that you may come to believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that through believing you may have life in his name.

Prayer

Risen Christ,

We ask that you would hasten to adjust our eyes to the early morning Light of this new season of Resurrection, and that the dance between our faith and our doubt would rise into wonder. 

Forgive us for denying Your resurrection in what we have left undone and what we have done.

Raise to Life what is dead in us. 

Nurture the seeds of hope that have fallen in our midst, and teach us to scatter these seeds everywhere we go. 

Amen.

Setlist 4-23-2017

This week was the second Sunday of Easter, and our songs were gathered around the theme of....Easter.  Below, you’ll find the list of the songs and artists. Clicking the song titles will take you to the lyrics. Below the songs, you can find recordings from Sunday morning of a few of them, and below the recordings, there is an example of one way you might think of these songs in light of this week's theme. If you want to talk about any of these, feel free to comment at the bottom of this page or email me at jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Songs:

Heart Won't Stop by John Mark and Sarah McMillan

Amazing Grace by Citizens & Saints

Rise Up by Bifrost Arts

Noise by Jameson McGregor

Mystery by Jameson McGregor (adapted from Charlie Hall)

Doxology

How They Fit In:

There are many ways to think about the significance of songs and the way they fit together–-this is simply one way you can look at these songs in light of this week’s theme. 

Heart Won't Stop: In Easter, we find that there are no barriers that God is not willing to cross to set things right with us.  The refrain of "Your heart won't stop coming after me" is about more than just a vague notion of the Love of God, but rather speaks to the redemptive force of the Love of God.  This season offers us an opportunity to consider the work that God is doing in creation, and the God is drawing us into in our own lives.

Amazing Grace: The Resurrection is a transformative act of grace that has implications for the whole of creation.  It is a Yes to life and the created world. This song talks about the implications of the Resurrection for our lives, and we sang it to rehearse speaking the truth about God's ongoing redemption project in our midst.

Rise Up: This song takes up the resurrection theme from a different angle; namely, that of the implications of the Resurrection for justice in the world.  Christ took up the cause of the oppressed (became oppressed), entered the depths of suffering and death, and in rising again, offers a distinct kind of hope that cycles of violence and oppression are not locked into the tracks they appear to be.  Christ's rising offers hope that the lowly to can rise.  The chorus of the song can be looked at in two ways: a plea for God to rise up to defend the cause of the oppressed, and a call to one another, as the body of Christ, to rise up to defend the cause of the oppressed. We sang this song to begin to broaden our understanding of who Jesus is as the Risen One, and who we are called to be as resurrection people.

Noise: This song is about God painting death and resurrection onto our lives by entering into our suffering and drawing us through it.  

Mystery:  We sang this song to look over our shoulder at last week's songs.  This is what we said about Mystery then:  This is a protest song.  And Easter is a protest day.  In the Resurrection of Jesus, we have the defeat of death, yes, but we also have an empire and religious institution put to shame as their supposedly final assertion of power over the trouble-maker Jesus doesn't work.  If the power that corrupt systems of oppression carry is falsified, these systems cannot hope to stand for long.  So, the formula Christ has died, Christ is risen, Christ will come again is multi-valent, and one of those valences is of the raised-fist variety.  This was true then, and it is true now.  

Doxology: We close our time together each week with this proclamation that God is worthy of praise from every inch of the cosmos.

-JM

ITLOTC 4-21-17

ITLOTC

(In The Life Of The Church) 

Easter

Working @ UBC by Taylor Post

I’ve been working at UBC for almost two months now (or 7.5 weeks or 54 days - whichever unit of measurement you prefer) and there are a few things I’ve learned during that time that I would like to share with all of you. Here we go:

  • UBC has the cutest, smartest, best kids in all of Waco and probably all of the world (this is my opinion but it is also a fact)
  • Having an office upstairs means that I get a lot of uninterrupted work time - which is good because I’m easily distracted (also – my office is upstairs! Come visit me anytime!)
  • Nintendo’s respond best to their owners – like how your dog comes when you call it’s name 
  • The person on staff most likely to tell you how it is (but in a kind way) is Jamie (this is a trait I value very much and I’m jealous of Jamie for possessing it)
  • The person on staff most likely to ask you thoughtful questions that make you stop and think really hard is Toph
  • The person on staff most likely to engage you in fun and meaningful conversation is Josh
  • The person on staff most likely to check on you and make sure that you’re doing alright is Amy
  • My favorite person to work with on staff is…yeah right, like I’d really choose a favorite. (Or if I did like I’d let anyone know!!)
  • UBC Kids volunteers are some of the most dedicated people I’ve ever met – I am so thankful for volunteers who love our kids well and are passionate about teaching kids about who God is and how God loves them
  • The lectionary text for this week is about Thomas (you know Thomas, the one that doubts things) – and I’ve been thinking all week about how lucky I am to be at a place that doesn’t think of doubt as a dirty word. A place where I can encourage kids to ask questions and assure them that God is big enough for them to have doubts
  • I will NEVER get tired of meeting sweet new babies!!
  • The person on staff most likely to make fun of the Enneagram is (basically anyone that’s not me or Josh, but especially) Toph
  • Josh can load and unload coffee mugs into the dishwasher at an intimidatingly fast pace
  • “It ALWAYS works out!” This is one of the things Emily (Nance) told me my first week on the job and she’s yet to be wrong. No matter how crazy things are looking on Wednesday or Thursday by Sunday morning everything has always settled down

 

    “It ALWAYS works out” has proven to be a pretty good mantra for me over the past few weeks. Although “Love God, embrace beauty, and live life to the fullest” will work in a pinch too. So, I’ve learned a lot in my first (almost) two months at UBC, but there is certainly a lot more left to learn. And I’m looking forward to learning it. 

Graduate Luncheon

If you are graduating anytime in 2017, we would like to invite you to stay for lunch after church on April 30th. The lunch is for those graduating hs, college, grad school, or phd. There will be a sign up sheet in the foyer on Sunday. If you have any questions, please email toph@ubcwaco.org

Pastoral Associates

UBC is now accepting applications for the pastoral associate program.  You can read more about the program and find the information needed to apply by clicking  here

The Middle Ages

The Middle Ages are going to the Baylor pla , Noises Off, on Saturday, April 29.   Stan Denman is directing and says it’s HILARIOUS.   UBC group tickets must be purchased by the 19th by calling the box office 710-1865.  For more information on the event email Jeff_Walter@baylor.edu. 

Work is Worship

Greeters: Blaylocks 

Coffee Makers: Moshers 

Mug Cleaners: 

Money Counter: Hannah K 

Announcements

  • Sunday Sermon: 
  • April 30th - Mr. Rogers Sunday
  • April 30th - Graduate Luncheon
  • May 2nd - Study Hall 
  • May 5th - Rend Collective @ UBC

Do you have an emergency and need to talk to a pastor? 

254 413 2611

Leadership Team

If you have a concern or an idea for UBC that you’d like to share with someone that is not on staff, feel free to contact one of our leadership team members. 

Chair- Jon Davis: jdavis83@gmail.com

Byron Griffin: byrontgriffin@gmail.com

Stan Denman: Stan_Denman@baylor.edu

Adam Winn:  adamwinn68@yahoo.com

Bridget Heins: bheins@hot.rr.com

Sharyl Loeung: sharylwl@gmail.com

Emma Wood: emmaj.wood@yahoo.com

Student Position: Samuel Moore: samuel_moore2@baylor.edu

Student Position: Leah Reed: Leah_Reed@baylor.edu

UBC Finance Team

Do you have a question about UBC’s financial affairs? Please feel free to contact any of your finance team members.

Josh McCormick: Josh.McCormick@dwyergroup.com

Hannah Kuhl: HannahKuhl@hotmail.com  

Justin Pond: pondjw@gmail.com

Anna Tilson: Anna_Tilson@jrbt.com

Doug McNamee: douglas_mcnamee@baylor.edu

UBC HR Team

If you have concerns about staff and would like contact our human resources team, please feel free to email any of the following members.

Maxcey Blaylock: maxceykite@gmail.com

Mathew Crawford: mathewcrawford@yahoo.com

Rob Engblom: Rob_Engblom@baylor.edu

Ross Van Dyke: Ross_Vandyke@baylor.edu

Jared Gould: jared.gould1@gmail.com

Liturgy 4-16-2017

This blog is a record of the call to worship, Scripture readings, and prayers from our Sunday liturgies.  If you are interested in writing something for the liturgy, or if you have a concern about any aspect of our liturgy, please email jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Call to Worship

We have gathered to bear witness
to the story that changes every story

when the women came to mourn
they found their Hope raised anew

we have gathered to speak again
the wonder that echoes off the edge of time

Christ has died
But death could not hold him
God set a Light in the darkness
And the darkness did not overcome it

Christ is Risen

He is Risen indeed
and now the reign of death
has fallen to Resurrection

 

Amen

Scripture

Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24

Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good;
his mercy endures for ever.
Let Israel now proclaim,
"His mercy endures for ever."

The Lord is my strength and my song,
and he has become my salvation.
There is a sound of exultation and victory
in the tents of the righteous:
"The right hand of the Lord has triumphed!
the right hand of the Lord is exalted!
the right hand of the Lord has triumphed!"

I shall not die, but live,
and declare the works of the Lord.
The Lord has punished me sorely,
but he did not hand me over to death.
Open for me the gates of righteousness;
I will enter them;
I will offer thanks to the Lord.

"This is the gate of the Lord;
he who is righteous may enter."

I will give thanks to you, for you answered me
and have become my salvation.
The same stone which the builders rejected
has become the chief cornerstone.
This is the Lord's doing,
and it is marvelous in our eyes.
On this day the Lord has acted;
we will rejoice and be glad in it.

Matthew 28:1-10

After the sabbath, as the first day of the week was dawning, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary went to see the tomb. And suddenly there was a great earthquake; for an angel of the Lord, descending from heaven, came and rolled back the stone and sat on it. His appearance was like lightning, and his clothing white as snow. For fear of him the guards shook and became like dead men.

But the angel said to the women, “Do not be afraid; I know that you are looking for Jesus who was crucified. He is not here; for he has been raised, as he said. Come, see the place where he lay. Then go quickly and tell his disciples, ‘He has been raised from the dead, and indeed he is going ahead of you to Galilee; there you will see him.’ This is my message for you.”

So they left the tomb quickly with fear and great joy, and ran to tell his disciples. Suddenly Jesus met them and said, “Greetings!” And they came to him, took hold of his feet, and worshiped him. Then Jesus said to them, “Do not be afraid; go and tell my brothers to go to Galilee; there they will see me.”

Prayer

This week's prayer was written by Jacob Robinson and myself:

Christ has died.  Christ is Risen.  Christ will come again.

God, we embrace this Yes that you have spoken into the world.

This word of hope that echoes off the edge of time.
This counterpoint to every word of death, oppression, and temporal power.

This word of affirmation to all things good and beautiful
This counterpoint to self-interest and control

This word of abundance
This counterpoint to all things driven by scarcity and fear.

And in embracing this Yes, we pray that you would make us into resurrection people.  People who carry your Yes in us, breathing life into death, hope into anguish, and peace into violence.

We ask this of you in the name of Jesus Christ, the Risen One, by the power of the Spirit of Life.

Amen.

 

Setlist 4-16-2017

Yesterday was Easter Sunday, and our songs were gathered with the death and Resurrection of Jesus in mind.  Below, you’ll find the list of the songs and artists. Clicking the song titles will take you to the lyrics. Below the songs, you can find recordings from Sunday morning of a few of them, and below the recordings, there is an example of one way you might think of these songs in light of this week's theme. If you want to talk about any of these, feel free to comment at the bottom of this page or email me at jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Songs:

In the Night by Andrew Peterson

Death In His Grave by John Mark McMillan

Mystery by Jameson McGregor (adapted from Charlie Hall)

Hope by Jameson McGregor

Wayward Ones by The Gladsome Light

Doxology

How They Fit In:

There are many ways to think about the significance of songs and the way they fit together–-this is simply one way you can look at these songs in light of this week’s theme. 

In the Night: We will be adding a piece to this song every week of Lent.  It traces a thread of struggle through the biblical narrative, ultimately building a case to hold hope in the midst of immense darkness.  We recorded a live version of this song last year, which you can download for free here.  

Death In His Grave: This song narrates the death and Resurrection of Jesus, and underscores the outcome of this Event: the death of death.  It also captures the reality-altering implications of this event for humans that Paul likens to Jesus being a second Adam.  We sang this song to step into this narrative in a more deliberate way and experience it anew.

Mystery: This is a protest song.  And Easter is a protest day.  In the Resurrection of Jesus, we have the defeat of death, yes, but we also have an empire and religious institution put to shame as their supposedly final assertion of power over the trouble-maker Jesus doesn't work.  If the power that corrupt systems of oppression carry is falsified, these systems cannot hope to stand for long.  So, the formula Christ has died, Christ is risen, Christ will come again is multi-valent, and one of those valences is of the raised-fist variety.  This was true then, and it is true now.  

Hope: This song uses the image from John of God setting a light in the darkness that the darkness did not overcome as a reference point for present hope (and interprets this image to refer to the Resurrection).  In the Resurrection, we see in action what we have hoped to be true: that God is present and active in brokenness, and is in the habit of making all things new.  And when we look back on our own lives in the moments most marred by pain, we find that they too evolved into something like broken pieces coming back together.  So when those pain-marred moments are our present moments, we can look back on the Resurrection and the resurrections we have experienced for the hope that God will raise us up again.

Wayward Ones: We sing this song every time we take communion to remind ourselves of a couple of things.  First, we are a broken people--though we are seeking to become more like Jesus, we often fail at this.  Second, Christ has given Himself for us despite our brokenness.  We take communion to remember the sacrifice of Jesus on our behalf, even though we did not, and do not, deserve it.

Doxology: We close our time together each week with this proclamation that God is worthy of praise from every inch of the cosmos.

-JM

ITLOTC 4-14-17

ITLOTC

(In The Life Of The Church) 

Lent

Obituaries

 

Meet Our Newest UBCer

Ellie Jane Wood

Birthday: 4/4/17

Birth Weight: 6 lb. 1 oz. 

Birth Height: 18 1/4 inches 

Enneagram Number: 3 

UBC Volunteer Party

Do you volunteer at UBC, or volunteer with any of our community partners?  If so, please join us for a party after church, on Sunday, April 23, from 12-2:30pm.  We will provide the lunch, and the good times.  Be looking for more information about the location/details of the party in the near future, but go ahead and mark April 23rd as the party of the year.  

The Middle Ages

The Middle Ages are going to the Baylor pla , Noises Off, on Saturday, April 29.   Stan Denman is directing and says it’s HILARIOUS.   UBC group tickets must be purchased by the 19th by calling the box office 710-1865.  For more information on the event email Jeff_Walter@baylor.edu. 

Work is Worship

Greeters: Will & Richardsons 

Coffee Makers: Kareem 

Mug Cleaners: Faith Williams 

Money Counter: Hannah Kuhl 

Announcements

  • Sunday Sermon: Matthew 28:1-10 "Go to Galilee: The Hermeneutic of Obedience" 
  • April 30th - Mr. Rogers Sunday
  • April 30th - Graduate Luncheon
  • May 2nd - Study Hall 
  • May 5th - Rend Collective @ UBC

Do you have an emergency and need to talk to a pastor? 

254 413 2611

Leadership Team

If you have a concern or an idea for UBC that you’d like to share with someone that is not on staff, feel free to contact one of our leadership team members. 

Chair- Jon Davis: jdavis83@gmail.com

Byron Griffin: byrontgriffin@gmail.com

Stan Denman: Stan_Denman@baylor.edu

Adam Winn:  adamwinn68@yahoo.com

Bridget Heins: bheins@hot.rr.com

Sharyl Loeung: sharylwl@gmail.com

Emma Wood: emmaj.wood@yahoo.com

Student Position: Samuel Moore: samuel_moore2@baylor.edu

Student Position: Leah Reed: Leah_Reed@baylor.edu

UBC Finance Team

Do you have a question about UBC’s financial affairs? Please feel free to contact any of your finance team members.

Josh McCormick: Josh.McCormick@dwyergroup.com

Hannah Kuhl: HannahKuhl@hotmail.com  

Justin Pond: pondjw@gmail.com

Anna Tilson: Anna_Tilson@jrbt.com

Doug McNamee: douglas_mcnamee@baylor.edu

UBC HR Team

If you have concerns about staff and would like contact our human resources team, please feel free to email any of the following members.

Maxcey Blaylock: maxceykite@gmail.com

Mathew Crawford: mathewcrawford@yahoo.com

Rob Engblom: Rob_Engblom@baylor.edu

Ross Van Dyke: Ross_Vandyke@baylor.edu

Jared Gould: jared.gould1@gmail.com

Liturgy 4-9-2017

This blog is a record of the call to worship, Scripture readings, and prayers from our Sunday liturgies.  If you are interested in writing something for the liturgy, or if you have a concern about any aspect of our liturgy, please email jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Call to Worship

Today, we gather alongside the rabble who welcomed Jesus into Jerusalem

Proclaiming, “Blessed is the One
who comes in the name of the Lord.”

Blessed is the One Whose power is made perfect in weakness

Who draws victory out of defeat
hope out of pain
And life out of death.

Lord Christ, who emptied Yourself for our sake,

Teach us to wear our weakness as You wore Yours
So that we can be more fully formed into your image.

Amen.

Scripture

Psalm 31:9-16

Have mercy on me, O Lord, for I am in trouble;
my eye is consumed with sorrow,
and also my throat and my belly.
For my life is wasted with grief,
and my years with sighing;
my strength fails me because of affliction,
and my bones are consumed.

I have become a reproach to all my enemies and even to my neighbors,
a dismay to those of my acquaintance;
when they see me in the street they avoid me.
I am forgotten like a dead man, out of mind;
I am as useless as a broken pot.

For I have heard the whispering of the crowd;
fear is all around;
they put their heads together against me;
they plot to take my life.

But as for me, I have trusted in you, O Lord.
I have said, "You are my God.
My times are in your hand;
rescue me from the hand of my enemies,
and from those who persecute me.

Make your face to shine upon your servant,
and in your loving-kindness save me.”

Philippians 2:5-11

Let the same mind be in you that was in Christ Jesus,

who, though he was in the form of God,
did not regard equality with God
as something to be exploited, 

but emptied himself,
taking the form of a slave, 
being born in human likeness. 

And being found in human form,
he humbled himself
and became obedient to the point of death-- 
even death on a cross. 

Therefore God also highly exalted him
and gave him the name
that is above every name, 

so that at the name of Jesus
every knee should bend, 
in heaven and on earth and under the earth, 

and every tongue should confess
that Jesus Christ is Lord, 
to the glory of God the Father.

 

Setlist 4-9-2017

This week was the final week of Lent (Palm Sunday), and our songs were gathered with this in mind.  Below, you’ll find the list of the songs and artists. Clicking the song titles will take you to the lyrics. Below the songs, you can find recordings from Sunday morning of a few of them, and below the recordings, there is an example of one way you might think of these songs in light of this week's theme. If you want to talk about any of these, feel free to comment at the bottom of this page or email me at jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Songs:

In the Night by Andrew Peterson

Here Is Our King by David Crowder* Band

Lord, I Need You by Matt Maher

Anthem by Leonard Cohen

Up on a Mountain by The Welcome Wagon

Be Thou My Vision

How They Fit In:

There are many ways to think about the significance of songs and the way they fit together–-this is simply one way you can look at these songs in light of this week’s theme. 

In the Night: We will be adding a piece to this song every week of Lent.  It traces a thread of struggle through the biblical narrative, ultimately building a case to hold hope in the midst of immense darkness.  We recorded a live version of this song last year, which you can download for free here.  

Here Is Our King: We sang this song to engage the story of Jesus' entry into Jerusalem.  As the people who gathered to welcome him in, our assumptions about who Jesus is and what Jesus is about to do are questionable.  We can say that we understand that Jesus is going to grasp victory through defeat, glory through humility, etc., but there is still something in us that clings to a Jesus whose power looks like whatever sort of conquering images are engrained in us.  We are people who, even though we know how the story of Jesus' death turns out still have to force ourselves to slow down and engage the weight of the suffering and darkness that precedes the Resurrection.  And as a result, we rob ourselves of any hope of grasping the profundity of that Event.

Lord, I Need You: We sang this song for two reasons.  The first is the same reason that we have been singing it during some of the other weeks of Lent: to remind ourselves that the transformation that we are reckoning with is work that the Spirit is doing in us, and to rehearse offering this confession so that we can find these words in the moments we need them the most.  The second is related to the call that is presented as Jesus enters Jerusalem: will we ride with him?  Will we walk the path that he is on?  Will we follow him to the place that not even he wants to go?  If we have any hope of saying yes to any of these, we will need the aid of God.

Anthem: This is a Leonard Cohen song.  Which means it is multi-valent, dense, and profound.  We sang it at the end of Lent because we are exiting a season in which we know that we are not capable of making a perfect offering out of our lives, whether through being burt out by our lenten practices, our on again/off again relationship to our lenten practices, or our failure to even develop and attempt a lenten practice.  Lent leaves a crack in any sense of self-righteousness that we have accumulated over the past year, and makes way for the Light of Easter.  This is something I talked about in the newsletter on Friday (you can read that here), which I suppose also led to this song showing up yesterday.

Up on a Mountain: This song jumps ahead to Thursday night in the narrative of Holy Week, where we find Jesus having a breakdown in the garden of Gethsemane.  In his loneliness and his fear, we find that we are not alone--that the Christ has entered into the depths of the human condition (with more depths to come on Friday and Saturday), and has met us there.  

Be Thou My Vision:  During Lent, we depart from our typical singing of the Doxology to close our time together.  As we wander the wilderness of Lent, learning more about who we are and what we are for, we carry these words on our tongues, time and again asking God to be our vision, wisdom, and security.

-JM

ITLOTC 4-7-17

ITLOTC

(In The Life Of The Church) 

Lent

Lent and the Fullness of Life

We’ve spent the last five weeks in the wilderness of Lent.  Our time in this season will come to an end one week from today on Good Friday.  This season is always difficult in one way or another—the introspective, penitent work of Lent is grueling, as is sticking with it at all—but it is important because it ultimately charts our personal spiritual growth for the coming year.  Now, charting out growth is by no means the most central purpose of Lent, but it functions this way nonetheless.  

Some of you, through your lenten practices, have learned a lot about certain parts of your life that the Spirit is working to transform, and that work is likely not finished yet (is it ever?).  Others of you have stepped in and out of some sort of practice, and you are left wondering if you even have the ability to make a consistent effort to lean into the work the Spirit is doing in your life (you are not alone!).  Those two outcomes aren’t really all that different.  One way or another, Lent teaches us something about ourselves.

Like every season of the Church calendar, the emphases that Lent brings to our worshipping lives are not meant to be relegated solely to the 40ish days preceding Easter.  Instead, Lent provides some structure—or an excuse—by which we might devote our attention to an aspect of the Christian life that is always relevant.

Jesus always stands as a mirror before us, both showing us who we were made to be and revealing how far we fall short.  Lent gives us the opportunity to practice looking in the mirror.  It helps us learn to accept the truth about who we are (or who we are not), to let it sting, and to lean into the pain of transformation.  This process isn’t fun, but it saves us.  And I don’t mean from an eternal hell, but instead from an empty existence, a temporal hell. [Side note: How did Christianity, a faith centered around a Christ whose recorded ministry is basically a string of narratives about him saving people from any number of things (false self narratives, illnesses, social stigmas, broken relationships, weddings without wine, hunger, etc.), ever become so hijacked by the idea that the saving effect it has on one’s life kicks in after we die?]  Jesus came that we might have life, and life to the fullest.

The path to life to the fullest is the space between our eyes and the Mirror.  It’s the place where our sin is laid bare before us.  Our narratives of scarcity, our sense that there is lack within us that we could remedy if only we had x, y, or z, and the dance between selfishness and self-loathing that takes place just beneath our conscious thought, are all keeping us from truly living, and they are all confronted in the person of Jesus.  Learning to accept this painful realization about ourselves offers us the ability to speak the truth about ourselves, which the recovery movement champions as the first step toward healing.  

Thus, Lent interrupts our lives with a renewed grip on who we are and what exactly Jesus is saving us from, but is also part of that very salvation.  It forms a crack in any self-righteousness that we have accumulated; a crack that we desperately need as we enter Holy Week.  Because on the other side of the darkness that waits on Friday and Saturday, there is a Light.  And that crack is going to be the way this Light reaches us.

If you want to discuss any of this further, feel free to email jamie@ubcwaco.org.

TOWN HALL

We will be having our quarterly town hall this Sunday after church. Among other things we will be discussing the future use of space in our building and possible solutions outside of our building. Please be thinking of these questions:

1. how can UBC use the space we currently have better? 
2. would I be for or against a building project on the land we own across the street on Flint? 
3. what are some specific strategies for all of our kid's space needs?

this town hall will be a little different. we will be breaking up into small groups and discussing our ideas with leadership team members.

Meet Our Newest UBCer

Marguerite "Maggie" Grace McNamee

Birthday: 3/16/17

Birth Height: 7 lb 8 oz

Birth Weight: 20 inches 

Enneagram Number: 7

Holy Week Schedule

Maunday Thursday Potluck Dinner and Communion.  Bring a dish to share and join your fellow UBCers as we make our way through the communion liturgy.  It's a time to reflect and fellowship.  Service will be located in the backside and starts @ 5:30.  Please email josh@ubcwaco.org if you have any questions.  

Good Friday service will take place on Friday evening @ 5:30.  This is a tradition Good Friday service that is somber in nature.  Children are welcome and wanted, but there will be no childcare.    The liturgy will last about 30 minutes.  That service will be located in the sanctuary and will also begin at 5:30.  Email jamie@ubcwaco.org if you have any questions.  

Thailand Shirts - http://www.ubcwaco.org/new-page/

Help support our team going to Thailand to work with UBC’s missionary partners in May.  The shirts are $20, and all proceeds go to help the team member you select from the drop down menu.  If you have any questions, please contact toph@ubcwaco.org

Graduate Luncheon

If you are graduating anytime in 2017 (may, august, or december) we would love to have you stay for lunch after church on April 30th.  This is for all who are finishing hs, college, grad school, or phd.  There will be a sign-up sheet the next three weeks in the foyer, make sure to put your name if you want to come to lunch.  This will be a special time for us to say thank you as a staff, and for you to reflect on your time at UBC.  If you have any questions, please contact toph@ubcwaco.org  

SWCC Easter Egg Hunt

It is that time of a year again, we are helping our friends at the South Waco Community Center through one of Waco’s largest Easter Egg Hunts.  We are dropping over 8,000 eggs this year, so we definitely need your help.  The Easter Egg Hunt is on Saturday, April 8th, at 11am.  If you would like to volunteer, you can email toph@ubcwaco.org . Volunteers will need to be at the community center by 10:30am, and we will be done by noon.  I’ve heard, anyone who volunteers receives extra candy in their easter basket!  If you have any questions, contact Toph.

UBC Volunteer Party

Do you volunteer at UBC, or volunteer with any of our community partners?  If so, please join us for a party after church, on Sunday, April 23, from 12-2:30pm.  We will provide the lunch, and the good times.  Be looking for more information about the location/details of the party in the near future, but go ahead and mark April 23rd as the party of the year.  

Work is Worship

Greeters: Ricky & Juliet 

Coffee Makers: 

Mug Cleaners: Cooleys 

Money Counter: 

Announcements

  • Sunday Sermon: Philippians 2:5-11
  • April 7th and 8th - Spring Retreat (Freshman/Sophomores)
  • April 13th - Maundy Thursday
  • April 14th - Good Friday
  • April 16th - Easter
  • April 22--The Middle Ages Baylor Theatre production of the comedy NOISES OFF— 
  • April 30th - Mr. Rogers Sunday
  • April 30th - Graduate Luncheon
  • May 2nd - Study Hall 
  • May 5th - Rend Collective @ UBC

Do you have an emergency and need to talk to a pastor? 

254 413 2611

Leadership Team

If you have a concern or an idea for UBC that you’d like to share with someone that is not on staff, feel free to contact one of our leadership team members. 

Chair- Jon Davis: jdavis83@gmail.com

Byron Griffin: byrontgriffin@gmail.com

Stan Denman: Stan_Denman@baylor.edu

Adam Winn:  adamwinn68@yahoo.com

Bridget Heins: bheins@hot.rr.com

Sharyl Loeung: sharylwl@gmail.com

Emma Wood: emmaj.wood@yahoo.com

Student Position: Samuel Moore: samuel_moore2@baylor.edu

Student Position: Leah Reed: Leah_Reed@baylor.edu

UBC Finance Team

Do you have a question about UBC’s financial affairs? Please feel free to contact any of your finance team members.

Josh McCormick: Josh.McCormick@dwyergroup.com

Hannah Kuhl: HannahKuhl@hotmail.com  

Justin Pond: pondjw@gmail.com

Anna Tilson: Anna_Tilson@jrbt.com

Doug McNamee: douglas_mcnamee@baylor.edu

UBC HR Team

If you have concerns about staff and would like contact our human resources team, please feel free to email any of the following members.

Maxcey Blaylock: maxceykite@gmail.com

Mathew Crawford: mathewcrawford@yahoo.com

Rob Engblom: Rob_Engblom@baylor.edu

Ross Van Dyke: Ross_Vandyke@baylor.edu

Jared Gould: jared.gould1@gmail.com

Liturgy 4-2-2017

This blog is a record of the call to worship, Scripture readings, and prayers from our Sunday liturgies.  If you are interested in writing something for the liturgy, or if you have a concern about any aspect of our liturgy, please email jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Call to Worship

Lord of mercy,
we have gathered to be formed in the way of Christ

to become more fully
who we were made to be

spread a balm over our eyes
that we may see people like You do

 lay coals on our tongues
that we may speak truly

replace our hearts of stone
with hearts that feel

and renew our minds
with the imaginative power of Your Spirit

Amen

Scripture

Psalm 130

Out of the depths have I called to you, O Lord;
Lord, hear my voice;
let your ears consider well the voice of my supplication.
If you, Lord, were to note what is done amiss,
O Lord, who could stand?

For there is forgiveness with you;
therefore you shall be feared.
I wait for the Lord; my soul waits for the Lord;
in the Lord’s word is my hope.
My soul waits for the Lord,
more than watchmen for the morning,
more than watchmen for the morning.

O Israel, wait for the Lord,
for with the Lord there is mercy;
With the Lord there is plenteous redemption,
and the Lord shall redeem Israel from all their sins.

John 9:1-12

As Jesus walked along, he saw a man blind from birth. His disciples asked him, “Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?” Jesus answered, “Neither this man nor his parents sinned; he was born blind so that God’s works might be revealed in him. We must work the works of him who sent me while it is day; night is coming when no one can work. As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world.”

When he had said this, he spat on the ground and made mud with the saliva and spread the mud on the man’s eyes, saying to him, “Go, wash in the pool of Siloam” (which means Sent). Then he went and washed and came back able to see. The neighbors and those who had seen him before as a beggar began to ask, “Is this not the man who used to sit and beg?” Some were saying, “It is he.” Others were saying, “No, but it is someone like him.”

He kept saying, “I am the man.” But they kept asking him, “Then how were your eyes opened?” He answered, “The man called Jesus made mud, spread it on my eyes, and said to me, ‘Go to Siloam and wash.’ Then I went and washed and received my sight.”

They said to him, “Where is he?” He said, “I do not know.”

Prayer

This week's prayer was from An Iona Prayer Book (p.53):

Guide and Friend
of every seeking heart,
you take upon yourself
all that burdens our lives:
our days of doubt,
our divided hearts,
our physical weakness
and that fear of the future
which is often our companion.
And you transfigure them,
freeing us of all that weighs us down.
Lord of the perplexed,
enable us today to rediscover
your amazing truth--
that in your strength
we truly can begin to walk anew
with lightened step and clearer vision,
moving from the shadows
into the clear flowing waters
of your healing, gentle grace.
Amen.

Setlist 4-2-2017

This week was the fifth week of Lent, and our songs were gathered with this in mind.  Below, you’ll find the list of the songs and artists. Clicking the song titles will take you to the lyrics. Below the songs, you can find recordings from Sunday morning of a few of them, and below the recordings, there is an example of one way you might think of these songs in light of this week's theme. If you want to talk about any of these, feel free to comment at the bottom of this page or email me at jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Songs:

In the Night by Andrew Peterson

Deliver Me by David Crowder* Band

There's A Wideness in God's Mercy by Jameson McGregor (adapted from F. Faber)

At the Gate by Electrofolk Revival (performed by Emily Hass)

Wayward Ones by The Gladsome Light

Be Thou My Vision

How They Fit In:

There are many ways to think about the significance of songs and the way they fit together–-this is simply one way you can look at these songs in light of this week’s theme. 

In the Night: We will be adding a piece to this song every week of Lent.  It traces a thread of struggle through the biblical narrative, ultimately building a case to hold hope in the midst of immense darkness.  We recorded a live version of this song last year, which you can download for free here.  

Deliver Me: As we draw near to Easter, this song voices the longing that is going to be addressed in the Resurrection.  In the resurrection, our deepest existential anguish is confronted and shattered.  But standing before this moment in our journey through the Christian story, the weight of tragedy, the madness of the world, our own fears, and our own tendency to be driven by scarcity, presses in all around us, and we begin to wear thin from holding on to the hope that this Jesus we have been coming to know is who we think he is.  

There's A Wideness in God's Mercy: We sang this song to look over our shoulder at last week's songs.  This is what we said about There's A Wideness In God's Mercy then: This song speaks a word of mercy into our desert of Lent.  Even as we take time to notice our sin and to lean more deliberately into transformation, we sang this song to remind ourselves that the ever-wide mercy and ever-broad love of God wholly embraces us.

At the Gate:  I asked Emily what drew her to this song.  This is what she said: I forget that eternity is something to look forward to.  This song refreshes my understanding.

Wayward Ones: We sing this song every time we take communion to remind ourselves of a couple of things.  First, we are a broken people--though we are seeking to become more like Jesus, we often fail at this.  Second, Christ has given Himself for us despite our brokenness.  We take communion to remember the sacrifice of Jesus on our behalf, even though we did not, and do not, deserve it.

Be Thou My Vision:  During Lent, we depart from our typical singing of the Doxology to close our time together.  As we wander the wilderness of Lent, learning more about who we are and what we are for, we carry these words on our tongues, time and again asking God to be our vision, wisdom, and security.

-JM