Setlist 8-20-2017

This was the eleventh Sunday after Pentecost.  Our songs were gathered with this in mind.  Below, you’ll find the list of the songs and artists. Clicking the song titles will take you to the lyrics.  Below the songs, you can find an example of one way you might think of these songs in light of this week's theme. If you want to talk about any of these, feel free to comment at the bottom of this page or email me at jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Songs:

Pulse by Jameson McGregor

Death In His Grave by John Mark McMillan

Mystery by Jameson McGregor (adapted from Charlie Hall)

Inbreaking by Jameson McGregor

Crown Him With Many Crowns

Doxology

How They Fit In:

There are many ways to think about the significance of songs and the way they fit together–-this is simply one way you can look at these songs in light of this week’s theme. 

Pulse: This song is about the interconnectivity of creation--that the Spirit of Life is woven through the whole cosmos. It's also about our propensity to completely ignore this and decide instead which parts of God's beloved creation we want to consider worthy of love.  It is a confession of our brokenness and a petition for God to make us new.

Death In His Grave: This song is about the defeat of Death by the Resurrection of Jesus.  It stands as a reminder to us that the most fundamental existential victory has been won, and the final word about God's creation has been spoken.  It is a celebratory declaration of the work of God in the world, and a hopeful proclamation that the story of creation has been rewritten.

Mystery: "Christ has died/Christ is Risen/Christ will come again" is a refrain that has been present with the Church since its inception.  It is shorthand for the core of our story, and it is also shorthand for the fundamentally revolutionary roots of our faith.  It is a protest anthem.  Against death.  Against evil.  Against oppressive powers of all sorts.  It says, "Not even death can silence the Hope of Christ." 

Inbreaking: This song is a confession of the brokenness of the world, of the church, and of ourselves, and a petition for the Slaughtered Lamb to show us how to exit our tombs.

Crown Him With Many Crowns: We sang this song to look over our shoulder from our songs from two weeks ago.  This is what we said about Crown Him With Many Crowns then: A central focus of Ordinary Time is on seeking to be the presence of Christ in our particular time and place--that means to seek to be formed in the way of Christ in such a way that our lives are outposts of the Kingdom.  This song praises Christ as Lord, and speaks of the fact that his Kingdom is marked by peace and self-sacrificial love, thus helping us recenter on our minds on who we are called to be.

Doxology: We close our time together each week with this proclamation that God is worthy of praise from every inch of the cosmos.

-JM

ITLOTC 8-18-17

ITLOTC

(In The Life Of The Church) 

Ordinary Time

A Conversation Between Two Friends About Race

 

Kindergarten Commission

This Sunday we will be commissioning all #champions4thelord entering kindergarten.  If this is your child and you have not been contacted by our children's pastor taylor@ubcwaco.org, please email her and ask, "why haven't you contacted me about kindergarten commission?"  Also if you don't have a kid in Kindergarten, but are part of our community, please be praying for these #champions4thelord. 

First Youth Group Meeting of the Semester

UBC's youth group, The Order of the Phoenix, will meet for the first time this year on Wednesday August 23rd.  It's going to blow your mind.  If you have a question about our youth group, please email josh@ubcwaco.org.  

Jameson McGregor House Show (8/18)

TONIGHT August 18th, at 8pm, Jamie is playing a benefit show for his friends Casey and Brittany Ramirez as they prepare to move to China as CBF Partnership Advocates.  Tickets are $15, and all proceeds go toward their expenses.  You can get more info and purchase tickets here.

UBC Kids Back to School Movie Night/Parent Date Night (8/18)

TONIGHT from 6:30pm-9:30pm, we are going to be having a Back to School Movie Night for all UBC Kids! We will be playing games and having some back to school fun and watching a movie! (Also - I heard there's a really cool house show that night so if you're looking for childcare we've got you covered!) Dinner is NOT provided so make sure kids have eaten before they come. Please sign-up after church this Sunday, or you can email taylor@ubcwaco.org.

Work is Worship

Greeters:  Richardsons

Coffee Makers: Pereiras

Mug Cleaners:  Woods

Money Counter: Anna T. 

Announcements

  • Sunday Sermon:  matthew 15 "will you object?"
  • 8-23 OOTP First Meeting!!! (Welcome 5th graders!) 6-8 P.M. @ UBC
  • 8-27 Welcome Back Lunch after church served by Crucero 
  • 9-13 McLennan County Orphan Care Event 1: Generation Adoptions 
  • 9-17 Family Weekend Breakfast 
  • 9-22 Backside Event 1 
  • 9-24 NUBCer Lunch 

Do you have an emergency and need to talk to a pastor? 

254 413 2611

Leadership Team

If you have a concern or an idea for UBC that you’d like to share with someone that is not on staff, feel free to contact one of our leadership team members. 

Chair- Emma Wood:  emmaj.wood@yahoo.com

Byron Griffin: byrontgriffin@gmail.com

Stan Denman: Stan_Denman@baylor.edu

Adam Winn:  adamwinn68@yahoo.com

Bridget Heins: bheins@hot.rr.com

Sharyl Loeung: sharylwl@gmail.com

Jon Davis: jdavis83@gmail.com

Student Position: Samuel Moore: samuel_moore2@baylor.edu

Student Position: Leah Reed: Leah_Reed@baylor.edu

UBC Finance Team

Do you have a question about UBC’s financial affairs? Please feel free to contact any of your finance team members.

Josh McCormick: Josh.McCormick@dwyergroup.com

Hannah Kuhl: HannahKuhl@hotmail.com  

Justin Pond: pondjw@gmail.com

Anna Tilson: Anna_Tilson@jrbt.com

Doug McNamee: douglas_mcnamee@baylor.edu

UBC HR Team

If you have concerns about staff and would like contact our human resources team, please feel free to email any of the following members.

Rob Engblom: Rob_Engblom@baylor.edu

Ross Van Dyke: Ross_Vandyke@baylor.edu

Jared Gould: jared.gould1@gmail.com

Rebekah Powell: rppowell671@gmail.com

Kristen Richardson: wacorichardsons@gmail.com

Liturgy 8-13-2017

This blog is a record of the call to worship, Scripture readings, and prayers from our Sunday liturgies.  If you are interested in writing something for the liturgy, or if you have a concern about any aspect of our liturgy, please email jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Call to Worship

We have gathered to worship the Living God

The One who sees us
The One Who knows us

The One Who loves us

Carrying with us joys and sorrows, celebration and loss

To devote our attention to the One
who is with us through them all

To learn to see the Kingdom among in our midst

And to learn to look
for the Kingdom to come

Amen.

Scripture

Genesis 37:1-4, 12-28

Jacob settled in the land where his father had lived as an alien, the land of Canaan. This is the story of the family of Jacob. 

Joseph, being seventeen years old, was shepherding the flock with his brothers; he was a helper to the sons of Bilhah and Zilpah, his father’s wives; and Joseph brought a bad report of them to their father. Now Israel loved Joseph more than any other of his children, because he was the son of his old age; and he had made him a long robe with sleeves. But when his brothers saw that their father loved him more than all his brothers, they hated him, and could not speak peaceably to him.

Now his brothers went to pasture their father’s flock near Shechem. And Israel said to Joseph, “Are not your brothers pasturing the flock at Shechem? Come, I will send you to them.” He answered, “Here I am.” So he said to him, “Go now, see if it is well with your brothers and with the flock; and bring word back to me.” So he sent him from the valley of Hebron. 

He came to Shechem, and a man found him wandering in the fields; the man asked him, “What are you seeking?” “I am seeking my brothers,” he said; “tell me, please, where they are pasturing the flock.” The man said, “They have gone away, for I heard them say, ‘Let us go to Dothan.’“ So Joseph went after his brothers, and found them at Dothan. They saw him from a distance, and before he came near to them, they conspired to kill him.

They said to one another, “Here comes this dreamer. Come now, let us kill him and throw him into one of the pits; then we shall say that a wild animal has devoured him, and we shall see what will become of his dreams.” But when Reuben heard it, he delivered him out of their hands, saying, “Let us not take his life.” Reuben said to them, “Shed no blood; throw him into this pit here in the wilderness, but lay no hand on him” —that he might rescue him out of their hand and restore him to his father.

So when Joseph came to his brothers, they stripped him of his robe, the long robe with sleeves that he wore; and they took him and threw him into a pit. The pit was empty; there was no water in it. 

Then they sat down to eat; and looking up they saw a caravan of Ishmaelites coming from Gilead, with their camels carrying gum, balm, and resin, on their way to carry it down to Egypt.

Then Judah said to his brothers, “What profit is it if we kill our brother and conceal his blood? Come, let us sell him to the Ishmaelites, and not lay our hands on him, for he is our brother, our own flesh.”

And his brothers agreed. When some Midianite traders passed by, they drew Joseph up, lifting him out of the pit, and sold him to the Ishmaelites for twenty pieces of silver. And they took Joseph to Egypt.

Matthew 14:22-33

Jesus made the disciples get into the boat and go on ahead to the other side, while he dismissed the crowds. And after he had dismissed the crowds, he went up the mountain by himself to pray. When evening came, he was there alone, but by this time the boat, battered by the waves, was far from the land, for the wind was against them.

And early in the morning he came walking toward them on the sea. But when the disciples saw him walking on the sea, they were terrified, saying, “It is a ghost!” And they cried out in fear. But immediately Jesus spoke to them and said, “Take heart, it is I; do not be afraid.” 

Peter answered him, “Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.” He said, “Come.” So Peter got out of the boat, started walking on the water, and came toward Jesus. But when he noticed the strong wind, he became frightened, and beginning to sink, he cried out, “Lord, save me!”

Jesus immediately reached out his hand and caught him, saying to him, “You of little faith, why did you doubt?” When they got into the boat, the wind ceased. And those in the boat worshiped him, saying, “Truly you are the Son of God.” 

Prayer

This week's prayer was arranged by Toph, and was heavily influenced by several collects from the Book of Common Prayer you can find here.

O God, who is Creator of all, whose Son commanded us to love our enemies:  we pray for our brothers and sisters in Charlottesville, and we denounce the sin of racism that has plagued our country since its inception.  We ask that you would give us the courage to stand for truth and justice, to stand against evil in peaceful protest, and to learn from and stand alongside our black sisters and brothers who have suffered under this evil for far to long.  Grant us grace fearlessly to contend against evil and to make no peace with oppression; and lead them and us from prejudice to truth: deliver them and us from hatred, cruelty, and revenge; and in your good time enable us all to stand reconciled before you, through Jesus Christ our Lord. 

Amen. 

ITLOTC 8-11-17

ITLOTC

(In The Life Of The Church) 

Ordinary Time

Owning Things

“Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moths and vermin destroy, and where thieves break in and steal.  But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where moths and vermin do not destroy, and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.”     -  Jesus

I got a scooter.  I’ve wanted one for years.  I’ve spent more hours than you might think researching name brands like Vespa, Genuine, and Piaggio.  The reason I’ve never purchased a scooter, despite the fact that I’ve wanted one for years, is that it was not practical for our family.  We need two cars.  With six family members, two jobs, four different school locations, and all the demands of recreational activities, we’ve needed a minimum of two cars to meet transportation demand.  So even the small investment of a scooter seemed impractical given our need for two cars.

 

I’ve driven a Subaru Outback for the last couple years. I bought it in May of 2015 with 175K miles.  Dave Ramsey told me not to borrow money, so I paid cash for what I could.  It was terrible advice.  My car died a slow death, culminating in my refusal to replace the dead alternator.  

***

You need another detail before I can proceed with this story.  My mom brought her minivan down here last fall.  It now resides at our house.  It’s a Honda Odyssey that has a movie screen.  I love it because my kids don’t yell at me when I drive. They watch the movie.  

***

In the midst of brainstorming about what I was going to do to solve my scooter problem, it dawned on me.  Having always needed a second car to transport children and in the event of inclement weather, I’d never really considered buying a scooter.  But now !!!! …. I can use my mom’s car when need to.  So on a Thursday night I Craigslisted “scooters,” and by Friday I had test driven and purchased a 2015 Bentelli Valor with 140 miles on it.  

***

I was a business major.  I wish I had majored in something else.  I picked it because I was told it was easy.  Looking back, I think business is intuitive. It probably doesn’t need to be an entire major.  I think people should major in something like a language or sociology and then spend one year learning how to do the business they will be doing.  Anyone who I have talked to about “doing business” tells me they learned how to do it by doing it.  I liked my marketing classes, though, because that’s a kind of subset of psychology and art.  

The other exception would be my economics classes.  I had a Russian econ professor who constantly reminded us that economics was originally a branch of philosophy and he taught our class that way.  We spent an entire class period talking about why women are traditionally given diamond rings when they get engaged.  Another class period was given to chatting about the exponential value of a left shoe when you only have a right shoe.  

Every once in awhile I’d encounter an econ term that was covered in the residue of philosophical thought - language to explain human behavior in the marketplace that had pragmatic and explanatory power for the way people behave in all life.  This is why I’ve always thought that a handy way to diagnose sin is by reading a book on human economics.  

One such term is marginal diminishing utility.  It means that every time we return to an experience, our satisfaction with that object, person, or experience will be lessened.  Clothes wear out.  Children lose interest in toys.  Eventually, we move because we need a new scene.  That’s diminishing utility.

Because I was exposed to this word in college, I’ve made it part of my purchasing experience.  I’m asking, how will I feel about this in a year.  Does this thing have any chance of bringing me satisfaction in the future?  Or will it only make me happy now?  Indeed, that is a difficult question for us to answer as humans.  Sometimes we just simply don’t know.  

Because of this, I feel like I’ve gotten good at consumption.  Outside of disposable needs such as food and beverages, I don’t buy much.  My clothes usually last me about seven years and my wardrobe is minimal.  So when I do make bigger purchases or purchase “capital expenditures”  that have substantial shelf life (say, anything over a year), I usually feel good about it.

***

That is a long introduction for me to make the following point:  I LOVE MY SCOOTER.  I have so much fun riding it.  For the life of me, I cannot figure out why everyone in America with a reasonable commute and who also does not need to drive multiple human beings, does not own and drive one.  Am I in the honeymoon period with my scooter? Yes. But I suspect the marginal in my marginal diminishing utility will be ever so slight.  I take and get great joy in riding my scooter...  

Which makes me wonder about Jesus’ statement that I began with.  What does Jesus think about my relationship with stuff?

Jesus warns against money and having things all the time.  I could argue a list of pros and cons.  I could ride a bike.  I am burning fossil fuel.  I could have donated that money to charity.  It does take less fuel than most modes of transportation.  It was much less than a car.  I get to be outside when I ride it.

But that’s not actually what I’m asking.  Does Jesus consider my affection misplaced or does He take joy in my joy?  

Humans have needs.  We are not robots.  We need shelter, food, air, and clothing.  Is it okay to enjoy the things we need?  What if those needs get conflated with wants?  And how much does my life need to look like my Christian brother or sister in a developing country before I enjoy what I do have without guilt?

These are questions I think about quite a bit and cannot answer for myself in a  satisfactory manner.  So this is how I own what I have: With open hands.  The best way to love my scooter and all things that God has lent to me is by not owning them.  To be content if they were taken from me tomorrow.  Because tomorrow they will be rusty and stolen.  

Meet Our Newest HR Team Member

C3F95038-DF36-4A4E-826B-9FCDC95793CE.JPG

Name: Kristen Evans Richardson

what you do in Waco: I am the Director of Pastoral Care at Baylor

best Waco restaurant: Lula Jane’s, brunch at Homestead, Taqueria #9 (the white queso is the best!), and Zoe’s Kitchen

book, chapter, and/or verse of the bible that has been meaningful for you: Matthew 22:37-40          

favorite movie/show: This year…The Big Sick and La La Land, This is Us and Jimmy Fallon

a book that you’ve really enjoyed: This summer, How to Be Here by Rob Bell has been one where I have read and re-read chapters. 

Order of the Phoenix Meeting

After church this Sunday we will be hosting a meeting to discuss the upcoming year for the youth group.  If you are new to UBC our youth group begins when kids enter 5th grade and runs through high school.  Please either bring a lunch for your family or plan on grabbing something after church 

UBC Summer Party Dos

The summer is coming to a close, and we are throwing a party!  Join us at 6pm, on August 13th, for a grand finale to summer.  We will be eating dinner and hanging out at the Wood’s casa.  UBC will provide the main dish, as well as drinks, you need to bring a side to share with everyone.  Please sign-up after church this Sunday or next, or you can email toph@ubcwaco.org . 

Jameson McGregor House Show (8/18)

Next Friday, August 18th, at 8pm, Jamie is playing a benefit show for his friends Casey and Brittany Ramirez as they prepare to move to China as CBF Partnership Advocates.  Tickets are $15, and all proceeds go toward their expenses.  You can get more info and purchase tickets here.

UBC Kids Back to School Movie Night/Parent Date Night (8/18)

Next Friday, August 18th, from 6:30pm-9:30pm, we are going to be having a Back to School Movie Night for all UBC Kids! We will be playing games and having some back to school fun and watching a movie! (Also - I heard there's a really cool house show that night so if you're looking for childcare we've got you covered!) Dinner is NOT provided so make sure kids have eaten before they come. Please sign-up after church this Sunday, or you can email taylor@ubcwaco.org.

Work is Worship

Greeters:  Ricky & Juliet 

Coffee Makers:  Burns 

Mug Cleaners:  Nelsons

Money Counter: Hannah K 

Announcements

  • Sunday Sermon:  Matthew 14:22-33 "Stay In The Boat"
  • 8-13 OOTP Parent Meeting After Church @ UBC
  • 8-20 Kindergarten Commission 
  • 8-23 OOTP First Meeting!!! (Welcome 5th graders!) 6-8 P.M. @ UBC
  • 8-27 Welcome Back Lunch after church served by Crucero 
  • 9-13 McLennan County Orphan Care Event 1: Generation Adoptions 
  • 9-17 Family Weekend Breakfast 
  • 9-22 Backside Event 1 
  • 9-24 NUBCer Lunch 

Do you have an emergency and need to talk to a pastor? 

254 413 2611

Leadership Team

If you have a concern or an idea for UBC that you’d like to share with someone that is not on staff, feel free to contact one of our leadership team members. 

Chair- Emma Wood:  emmaj.wood@yahoo.com

Byron Griffin: byrontgriffin@gmail.com

Stan Denman: Stan_Denman@baylor.edu

Adam Winn:  adamwinn68@yahoo.com

Bridget Heins: bheins@hot.rr.com

Sharyl Loeung: sharylwl@gmail.com

Jon Davis: jdavis83@gmail.com

Student Position: Samuel Moore: samuel_moore2@baylor.edu

Student Position: Leah Reed: Leah_Reed@baylor.edu

UBC Finance Team

Do you have a question about UBC’s financial affairs? Please feel free to contact any of your finance team members.

Josh McCormick: Josh.McCormick@dwyergroup.com

Hannah Kuhl: HannahKuhl@hotmail.com  

Justin Pond: pondjw@gmail.com

Anna Tilson: Anna_Tilson@jrbt.com

Doug McNamee: douglas_mcnamee@baylor.edu

UBC HR Team

If you have concerns about staff and would like contact our human resources team, please feel free to email any of the following members.

Rob Engblom: Rob_Engblom@baylor.edu

Ross Van Dyke: Ross_Vandyke@baylor.edu

Jared Gould: jared.gould1@gmail.com

Rebekah Powell: rppowell671@gmail.com

Kristen Richardson: wacorichardsons@gmail.com

Liturgy 8-6-2017

This blog is a record of the call to worship, Scripture readings, and prayers from our Sunday liturgies.  If you are interested in writing something for the liturgy, or if you have a concern about any aspect of our liturgy, please email jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Call to Worship

we have gathered to worship the One
who raises up those who are falling

to find rest in the One
who is just, kind, and compassionate

in our singing, praying, listening, and reflecting,

we seek to be transformed
into Kingdom people

to be formed by the Spirit

into people who carry
the work of Christ
in our ordinary lives.

Amen.

 

 

 

Scripture

Genesis 32:22-31

The same night he got up and took his two wives, his two maids, and his eleven children, and crossed the ford of the Jabbok.

He took them and sent them across the stream, and likewise everything that he had.

Jacob was left alone; and a man wrestled with him until daybreak.

When the man saw that he did not prevail against Jacob, he struck him on the hip socket; and Jacob's hip was put out of joint as he wrestled with him.

Then he said, "Let me go, for the day is breaking." But Jacob said, "I will not let you go, unless you bless me."

So he said to him, "What is your name?" And he said, "Jacob."

Then the man said, "You shall no longer be called Jacob, but Israel, for you have striven with God and with humans, and have prevailed."

Then Jacob asked him, "Please tell me your name." But he said, "Why is it that you ask my name?" And there he blessed him.

So Jacob called the place Peniel, saying, "For I have seen God face to face, and yet my life is preserved."

The sun rose upon him as he passed Penuel, limping because of his hip.

 

 

 

 

 

Matthew 14:13-21

Now when Jesus heard this, he withdrew from there in a boat to a deserted place by himself. But when the crowds heard it, they followed him on foot from the towns.

When he went ashore, he saw a great crowd; and he had compassion for them and cured their sick.

When it was evening, the disciples came to him and said, "This is a deserted place, and the hour is now late; send the crowds away so that they may go into the villages and buy food for themselves."

Jesus said to them, "They need not go away; you give them something to eat."

They replied, "We have nothing here but five loaves and two fish."

And he said, "Bring them here to me."

Then he ordered the crowds to sit down on the grass. Taking the five loaves and the two fish, he looked up to heaven, and blessed and broke the loaves, and gave them to the disciples, and the disciples gave them to the crowds.

And all ate and were filled; and they took up what was left over of the broken pieces, twelve baskets full.

And those who ate were about five thousand men, besides women and children.

Setlist 8-6-2017

This was the ninth Sunday after Pentecost.  Our songs were gathered with this in mind, and heavily influenced by the lectionary texts.  Below, you’ll find the list of the songs and artists. Clicking the song titles will take you to the lyrics.  Below the songs, you can find an example of one way you might think of these songs in light of this week's theme. If you want to talk about any of these, feel free to comment at the bottom of this page or email me at jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Songs:

Crown Him With Many Crowns

SMS [Shine] by David Crowder* Band

There's A Wideness in God's Mercy by Jameson McGregor (adapted from F. Faber)

Wearing Thin by Jameson McGregor

Wayward Ones by The Gladsome Light

Doxology

How They Fit In:

There are many ways to think about the significance of songs and the way they fit together–-this is simply one way you can look at these songs in light of this week’s theme. 

Crown Him With Many Crowns: A central focus of Ordinary Time is on seeking to be the presence of Christ in our particular time and place--that means to seek to be formed in the way of Christ in such a way that our lives are outposts of the Kingdom.  This song praises Christ as Lord, and speaks of the fact that his Kingdom is marked by peace and self-sacrificial love, thus helping us recenter on our minds on who we are called to be.

SMS [Shine]: This song is a petition for God to be present where God feels absent, and to make Godself known in love.  This presence applies to us personally in the midst of our own pain and doubt, and also asks that we ourselves be made into torches that spread the Light all around us.

There's A Wideness In God's Mercy: We sang this song to look over our shoulder at last week's songs.  This is what we said about There's A Wideness In God's Mercy then: This song serves as a reminder of two things: 1) God's mercy extends to us far more generously than we think we deserve; and 2) God's mercy extends to other people far more generously than we think they deserve.  

Wearing Thin: This song is about anxiety, specifically the anxiety that arises when the brokenness of the world seems far too great for us to push back against, but it ultimately serves as a petition for God to draw us in to the work of redemption that God is already doing.

Wayward Ones: We sing this song every time we take communion to remind ourselves of a couple of things.  First, we are a broken people--though we are seeking to become more like Jesus, we often fail at this.  Second, Christ has given Himself for us despite our brokenness.  We take communion to remember the sacrifice of Jesus on our behalf, even though we did not, and do not, deserve it.

Doxology: We close our time together each week with this proclamation that God is worthy of praise from every inch of the cosmos.

-JM

ITLOTC 8-4-17

ITLOTC

(In The Life Of The Church) 

Ordinary Time

Psalm 145

The lectionary Psalm for this Sunday is Psalm 145:8-9,14-21. It says:

8 God is all mercy and grace—
    not quick to anger, is rich in love.

9 God is good to one and all;
    everything he does is suffused with grace.

14 God gives a hand to those down on their luck,
    gives a fresh start to those ready to quit.

15 All eyes are on you, expectant;
    you give them their meals on time.

16 Generous to a fault,
    you lavish your favor on all creatures.

17 Everything God does is right—
    the trademark on all his works is love.

18 God’s there, listening for all who pray,
    for all who pray and mean it.

19 He does what’s best for those who fear him—
    hears them call out, and saves them.

20 God sticks by all who love him,
    but it’s all over for those who don’t.

21 My mouth is filled with God’s praise.
    Let everything living bless him,
    bless his holy name from now to eternity!

Psalm 145:8-9, 14-21


My favorite movie for the past 17 years has been Remember the Titans. I was in the 7th grade the first time I saw Remember the Titans and I watched (at least a part of) it every night from 7th grade until my senior year of high school. That’s ridiculous – but also true.

I loved Remember the Titans for a myriad of reasons – probably some reasons that at 13 I wasn’t really able to vocalize – but one of the reasons I loved it was because Denzel Washington gives a KILLER motivational speech that brings everybody together as teammates and friends. (Obviously.) And I have always been a fan of motivational speeches and catch-phrases – short, quick phrases that sound like things you could call out during an intramural volleyball game. Things like, “Team work makes the dream work!” or “You gotta risk it to get the biscuit!” Tiny motivational speeches.

Psalm 145:8 is kind of like the motivational catch-phrase of the Old Testament. It (or something very similar to it) is found 8 different times throughout Scripture – attesting to the mercy, grace, patience, and love of God. And the rest of Psalm 145 goes on to illustrate God’s mercy, grace, longsuffering, patient nature.

Psalm 145 tells us that God is good to one and all, and that everything God does is suffused with grace. That God gives a hand to those down on their luck and a fresh start to those ready to quit. That God provides food for the hungry on their hungriest of days. God is generous to a fault, (that’s the one that gets me – my imagination falters when I try to imagine being generous to a fault), and that God lavishes favor on all creatures. God is always right. The way that you know God has done something is because there is love infused throughout it.

Psalm 145 reminds us that God is always with us, always listening to our prayers, and to the prayers of all of those who call for God. That God does what is best for us and for everyone – and saves us in our hour of need. That God will never leave us.

I don’t know about you – but that’ll motivate me. It fires me up, calls me out, inspires me to be better. I mean – it’s no Denzel Washington-Remember the Titans-Gettysburg Battle Field-Motivational Speech. But it’ll do in a pinch.

- Taylor

taylor@ubcwaco.org

 

 

Meet Our Newest HR Team Member

Rebekah Powell

what you do in Waco: I am a Staff Trainer at Methodist Children's Home

best Waco restaurant: ummm...do I have to pick one? Cafe Homestead, Baris, Alpha Omega, Captain Billy Whizbangs

book, chapter, and/or verse of the bible that has been meaningful for you: Psalm 40. This passage kept popping up during a pretty tough time filled with a lot of doubt and pain. I would read this passage and hope that it was true and I am slowly starting to believe that it is.

favorite movie/show: Parks and Rec is one of my favorite shows and Inside Out is one of my favorite movies

a book that you’ve really enjoyed: Simply Jesus by N.T. Wright

UBC Summer Party Dos

The summer is coming to a close, and we are throwing a party!  Join us at 6pm, on August 13th, for a grand finale to summer.  We will be eating dinner and hanging out at the Wood’s casa.  UBC will provide the main dish, as well as drinks, you need to bring a side to share with everyone.  Please sign-up after church this Sunday or next, or you can email toph@ubcwaco.org . 

UBC Kids - Branch/Root End of Summer Pool Party

Our Branch/Root Class (Pre-K -4th Grade) is ending the summer with a bang! We're having an End of Summer Pool Party this Sunday August 6th from 3:30pm-5:30pm at the McNamee's house. There will be snacks and drinks provided as well as a certified lifeguard present. Please sign-up after church this Sunday or you can email taylor@ubcwaco.org  

Work is Worship

Greeters:  Walters 

Coffee Makers:  Lees 

Mug Cleaners: Winns 

Money Counter: Justin Pond 

Announcements

  • Sunday Sermon:  Matthew 14:13-21 "what, how and … why did God do this miracle?” 
  • Tuesday Dives Location:  Tuesday Dives have come to a conclusion for the 2017 season.  
  • 8-6 OOTP Pool Party After Church @ Baylor SLC 
  • 8-13 OOTP Parent Meeting After Church @ UBC
  • 8-20 Kindergarten Commission 
  • 8-23 OOTP First Meeting!!! (Welcome 5th graders!) 6-8 P.M. @ UBC
  • 8-27 Welcome Back Lunch after church served by Crucero 

Do you have an emergency and need to talk to a pastor? 

254 413 2611

Leadership Team

If you have a concern or an idea for UBC that you’d like to share with someone that is not on staff, feel free to contact one of our leadership team members. 

Chair- Emma Wood:  emmaj.wood@yahoo.com

Byron Griffin: byrontgriffin@gmail.com

Stan Denman: Stan_Denman@baylor.edu

Adam Winn:  adamwinn68@yahoo.com

Bridget Heins: bheins@hot.rr.com

Sharyl Loeung: sharylwl@gmail.com

Jon Davis: jdavis83@gmail.com

Student Position: Samuel Moore: samuel_moore2@baylor.edu

Student Position: Leah Reed: Leah_Reed@baylor.edu

UBC Finance Team

Do you have a question about UBC’s financial affairs? Please feel free to contact any of your finance team members.

Josh McCormick: Josh.McCormick@dwyergroup.com

Hannah Kuhl: HannahKuhl@hotmail.com  

Justin Pond: pondjw@gmail.com

Anna Tilson: Anna_Tilson@jrbt.com

Doug McNamee: douglas_mcnamee@baylor.edu

UBC HR Team

If you have concerns about staff and would like contact our human resources team, please feel free to email any of the following members.

Rob Engblom: Rob_Engblom@baylor.edu

Ross Van Dyke: Ross_Vandyke@baylor.edu

Jared Gould: jared.gould1@gmail.com

Rebekah Powell: rpowell671@gmail.com

Liturgy 7-30-2017

This blog is a record of the call to worship, Scripture readings, and prayers from our Sunday liturgies.  If you are interested in writing something for the liturgy, or if you have a concern about any aspect of our liturgy, please email jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Call to Worship

we have gathered to worship the Creator

to offer our attention and thanks
to the One in whom we live
and move and have our being

and to be formed in the way of Christ

to learn how to love,
how to live,
and how to die.

in these things, we seek
the wisdom of the Spirit

Who is present in our weakness,
active in our brokenness,
and calling us into the work of God in the world.

Amen.

Scripture

Genesis 29:15-28

Laban said to Jacob, “Because you are my kinsman, should you therefore serve me for nothing? Tell me, what shall your wages be?”

Now Laban had two daughters; the name of the elder was Leah, and the name of the younger was Rachel. Leah’s eyes were lovely, and Rachel was graceful and beautiful. Jacob loved Rachel; so he said, “I will serve you seven years for your younger daughter Rachel.”

Laban said, “It is better that I give her to you than that I should give her to any other man; stay with me.” So Jacob served seven years for Rachel, and they seemed to him but a few days because of the love he had for her. 

Then Jacob said to Laban, “Give me my wife that I may go in to her, for my time is completed.” So Laban gathered together all the people of the place, and made a feast. But in the evening he took his daughter Leah and brought her to Jacob; and he went in to her. (Laban gave his maid Zilpah to his daughter Leah to be her maid.)

When morning came, it was Leah! And Jacob said to Laban, “What is this you have done to me? Did I not serve with you for Rachel? Why then have you deceived me?” Laban said, “This is not done in our country—giving the younger before the firstborn. Complete the week of this one, and we will give you the other also in return for serving me another seven years.”

Jacob did so, and completed her week; then Laban gave him his daughter Rachel as a wife.

Matthew 13:31-33, 44-52

Jesus put before the crowds another parable: “The kingdom of heaven is like a mustard seed that someone took and sowed in his field; it is the smallest of all the seeds, but when it has grown it is the greatest of shrubs and becomes a tree, so that the birds of the air come and make nests in its branches.” 

He told them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven is like yeast that a woman took and mixed in with three measures of flour until all of it was leavened.”

“The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field, which someone found and hid; then in his joy he goes and sells all that he has and buys that field.

“Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a merchant in search of fine pearls; on finding one pearl of great value, he went and sold all that he had and bought it.

“Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a net that was thrown into the sea and caught fish of every kind; when it was full, they drew it ashore, sat down, and put the good into baskets but threw out the bad. So it will be at the end of the age. The angels will come out and separate the evil from the righteous and throw them into the furnace of fire, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth. 

“Have you understood all this?” They answered, “Yes.” And he said to them, “Therefore every scribe who has been trained for the kingdom of heaven is like the master of a household who brings out of his treasure what is new and what is old.”

 

 

 

Prayer

This week's prayer was from An Iona Prayer Book, and is based on a traditional Gaelic prayer:

Thanks be to you, O Christ our Lord,
for the many gifts you have given us:
each day and night, each sea and land,
each weather fair, each calm, each wild.

Today may we remember your mercy
given so gently and generously:
each thing we have received, from you it came;
each thing for which we hope, from your love it will come;
each thing we enjoy, it is of your bounty;
each thing we ask, comes of your disposing.

O Lord, from whom each thing that is freely flows,
grant that no tie over-strict, no tie over-dear,
may separate us from your constant love,
or from the needs of our neighbours
in whom your face shines
each day and night.

Amen.

Setlist 7-30-2017

This was the eighth Sunday after Pentecost.  Our songs were gathered with this in mind, and heavily influenced by the lectionary texts.  Below, you’ll find the list of the songs and artists. Clicking the song titles will take you to the lyrics.  Below the songs, you can find an example of one way you might think of these songs in light of this week's theme. If you want to talk about any of these, feel free to comment at the bottom of this page or email me at jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Songs:

Amazing Grace by Citizens & Saints

There's A Wideness in God's Mercy by Jameson McGregor (adapted from F. Faber)

Mystery by Jameson McGregor (adapted from Charlie Hall)

O Love That Will Not Let Me Go by Jameson McGregor (adapted from Ascend the Hill)

Hope by Jameson McGregor

Doxology

How They Fit In:

There are many ways to think about the significance of songs and the way they fit together–-this is simply one way you can look at these songs in light of this week’s theme. 

Amazing Grace: This song moves from a general sense of God's grace in our lives to a more particular consideration of what effect the grace of God has on the way we live.  This is gathered into an implicit challenge to live as stories of grace and agents of reconciliation.

There's A Wideness In God's Mercy: This song serves as a reminder of two things: 1) God's mercy extends to us far more generously than we think we deserve; and 2) God's mercy extends to other people far more generously than we think they deserve.  

Mystery: This song champions the story of Jesus' life, death, and resurrection as a song of hope for all of creation.

O Love That Will Not Let Me Go: This is a hymn to God's enduring presence with us.  Rather than speaking of the difficulty to hold on to God in the midst of suffering, it proclaims God's presence with those who suffer.  

Hope: We sang this song to look over our shoulder at last week's songs.  This is what we said about Hope then: This song clings to the hope that the work of redemption made visible in the Resurrection will spread to the entirety of the cosmos.  This hope is characterized as such because, at the moment, things are still not as they should be--the weeds are growing up with the wheat, so to speak.

Doxology: We close our time together each week with this proclamation that God is worthy of praise from every inch of the cosmos.

-JM

ITLOTC 7-28-17

ITLOTC

(In The Life Of The Church) 

Ordinary Time

Prayer and Psalms

Perhaps unsurprisingly, I find myself talking about prayer a lot.  When prayer has come up in conversations I’ve had with ubcer’s over the past couple of years, it has usually been in the context of either a frustration about what the point of prayer is or how one is supposed to pray in the first place—the why and the how of prayer.  It’s common enough that it seems newsletter-worthy, but it’s going to take several newsletters to begin to flesh this out.  

I’d like to start with the “why" of prayer, but I’m going to start with the "how" instead.  Because I think that there is an impulse in us--consciously or not, reasoned or otherwise--that brings prayer into our lives before we even care why we are doing it. 

At the moment, the way I’ve been thinking about the “how” of prayer is as a dance between specific structure and honest vulnerability; between form and feeling.

In his book Under the Unpredictable Plant, Eugene Peterson talks about the prayer that Jonah offers from the belly of the fish.  He points out, fascinatingly, that this prayer is entirely composed of language from the Psalms.  Peterson says, “Jonah had been to school to learn to pray, and he prayed as he had been taught.  His school was the Psalms.” 

Why would you look to the Psalms as a school of prayer?  There are probably a few ways to answer that.  

First, praying language that is established in the Psalms allows one to tie oneself to a long tradition of humanity grasping for words with which to address God.  It is an implicit reminder that the Divine-human relationship is not summed up best in the Divine-me relationship.  

And that’s important because 1) we might otherwise fool ourselves into thinking that we experience special kinds of doubt, pain, joy, thanks, etc. (we don’t); and 2) if we tie ourselves to the history of the people of God, we are able to remind ourselves that, though we might be experiencing something in life for the first time, we have a vantage point in this Story from which we are able to look back on who God has been, in order to suspect who God will continue to be.

Second, using the Psalms as a “school” of prayer helps us address the near-universal concern of not knowing what or how to pray.  It’s a starting place—a training ground.  And we need this not so that we can pray hyper religious things, but just the opposite—so we see how to be our actual selves in our prayers.  

This is sort of what Jesus is getting at when he criticizes the way that the Pharisees pray.  It doesn’t take an especially righteous person to catch on to flashy lingo in a religious system that will send out the vibe that you are particularly adept at talking to God.  Creating a mask to wear before God and people comes pretty naturally. 

In the Psalms, alongside various kinds of thanks, we find deep lament, expressing feelings of abandonment, pain, and longing.  We find a history of not putting on a mask when addressing God, but instead bringing vulnerability. 

Most of the time I speak with someone who says they don’t know how to pray, what they really mean is they are angry or feel abandoned and they can’t think of anything nice to say to God. Which in fact means they have plenty to say, and are fully capable of praying, but they don’t think what they would pray is allowed.  

But when we look at the Bible (and not even just the Psalms), I think we can rest assured that God can take it.  We need not withhold any part of who we are.

So, if we have words of lament and are looking for permission to speak them to God, the Psalms offer it.  But also, if we are in pain, yet don’t have the words to express it, the Psalms can offer us language to do so. 

Take the opening of Psalm 13, for example:

How long, O Lord?  
Will you forget me forever?  
How long will you hide your face from me?  
How long must I bear pain in my soul,
and have sorrow in my heart all day long?
 

The first time I needed words like this, I had never read this Psalm, so I sat and said nothing. [For the record, I think that was prayer too, and Paul talks about the Spirit interceding for us when our pain is too deep for words (Rom. 8:26, if you want to explore that further), but we’re talking about praying with words right now].  Had I been familiar with this Psalm, I likely would have taken up these words, or some version of them.    

Since coming into contact with this Psalm, I’ve gotten much better at expressing the abandonment of those verses, but what Psalm 13 has been teaching me lately is how to take up the final two verses:

But I trusted in your steadfast love;
my heart shall rejoice in your salvation.  
I will sing to the Lord,
because the Lord has dealt bountifully with me.

Sometimes moving to the twilight of darkness is hard for me.  And sometimes it feels like I don’t mean it.  But I’d like to.  So I say it anyway.  Because there is a way to take on a tunnel-vision that confuses the weight of a particular moment with the full truth about life and God.

The Psalms have a way of revealing when our prayers are too one-dimensional, and they challenge us to bring a balance to our prayers that is ultimately more honest.  They teach us to represent the whole of ourselves.

This is the dance of form and feeling that I mentioned earlier: we bring our experiences into conversation with the legacy of prayer in the Bible, seeking out forms, themes, and language, to offer prayers that say more than we might think we are capable of, and ultimately to speak more truthfully about who we are and who God is.

There’s so much more to say about this, but that’s going to have to wait for another week.  As always, if you have any feedback, questions, or concerns about any of this, feel free to email jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Meet Our Newest UBCer

Khoury Lev Ezekiel Loeung

IMG_20170621_172235_095.jpg

 

Birthday: June 14

Birth Weight: 5 lb. 11 oz. 

Birth Height: 19 inches 

Enneagram Number: 2

UBC Summer Party Dos

The summer is coming to a close, and we are throwing a party!  Join us at 6pm, on August 13th, for a grand finale to summer.  We will be eating dinner and hanging out at the Wood’s casa.  UBC will provide the main dish, as well as drinks, you need to bring a side to share with everyone.  Please sign-up after church this Sunday or next, or you can email toph@ubcwaco.org . 

Work is Worship

Greeters:  Blaylocks 

Coffee Makers: Burns 

Mug Cleaners: Woods 

Money Counter:  Hannah K. 

Announcements

  • Sunday Sermon: Matthew 13:31-33, 46-52
  • Please be in prayer for our next leadership team meeting which will be on Sunday July 30th. 
  • Tuesday Dives Location:  Fridays  
  • 7-?? Summer Event Dos ... more info to come 
  • 8-6 OOTP Pool Party After Church @ Baylor SLC 
  • 8-13 OOTP Parent Meeting After Church @ UBC
  • 8-23 OOTP First Meeting!!! (Welcome 5th graders!) 6-8 P.M. @ UBC

Do you have an emergency and need to talk to a pastor? 

254 413 2611

Leadership Team

If you have a concern or an idea for UBC that you’d like to share with someone that is not on staff, feel free to contact one of our leadership team members. 

Chair- Jon Davis: jdavis83@gmail.com

Byron Griffin: byrontgriffin@gmail.com

Stan Denman: Stan_Denman@baylor.edu

Adam Winn:  adamwinn68@yahoo.com

Bridget Heins: bheins@hot.rr.com

Sharyl Loeung: sharylwl@gmail.com

Emma Wood: emmaj.wood@yahoo.com

Student Position: Samuel Moore: samuel_moore2@baylor.edu

Student Position: Leah Reed: Leah_Reed@baylor.edu

UBC Finance Team

Do you have a question about UBC’s financial affairs? Please feel free to contact any of your finance team members.

Josh McCormick: Josh.McCormick@dwyergroup.com

Hannah Kuhl: HannahKuhl@hotmail.com  

Justin Pond: pondjw@gmail.com

Anna Tilson: Anna_Tilson@jrbt.com

Doug McNamee: douglas_mcnamee@baylor.edu

UBC HR Team

If you have concerns about staff and would like contact our human resources team, please feel free to email any of the following members.

Rob Engblom: Rob_Engblom@baylor.edu

Ross Van Dyke: Ross_Vandyke@baylor.edu

Jared Gould: jared.gould1@gmail.com

Liturgy 7-23-2017

This blog is a record of the call to worship, Scripture readings, and prayers from our Sunday liturgies.  If you are interested in writing something for the liturgy, or if you have a concern about any aspect of our liturgy, please email jamie@ubcwaco.org.

Call to Worship

we have gathered to worship
the One who is the first and the last

the One who is gracious and full of compassion,
slow to anger, and full of kindness and truth

the One who is present when we don’t know it

and who knows us completely

seeking undivided hearts
and a hope that can’t be tamed

so that we can join in God’s work of redemption
and cast Light into Light-starved places

Amen.